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email Server for CentOS 7

Hi folks.

I’m looking for an email server. I have a C7 box already with nginx, PostgreSQL, Sinatra and Ruby. So I don’t want to install PHP, Apache, MySQL, etc.

Are there any ways/tutorials to set up a mail server under those restrictions? It would serve multiple domains.

Cheers, Bee

Comments

Re: email Server for CentOS 7

By Mikhail Utin at 10/01/2018 - 10:13

Just to add. SurgeMail if available is very easy to install and run. I had the problem to get a server without going to complex configuration for my small company and it is possibly the best and reliable.

Mikhail Utin

Hi folks.

I’m looking for an email server. I have a C7 box already with nginx, PostgreSQL, Sinatra and Ruby. So I don’t want to install PHP, Apache, MySQL, etc.

Are there any ways/tutorials to set up a mail server under those restrictions? It would serve multiple domains.

Cheers, Bee

Re: email Server for CentOS 7

By Mikhail Utin at 10/01/2018 - 10:10

Hello,
For last several years I used SurgeMail server. For I think three or five accounts it is free. Works very good. I had only one problem - it was down for two month because of screwed CentOS update. After couple of updates it went back working. Configuration is web GUI and is pretty good.

Mikhail Utin

Hi folks.

I’m looking for an email server. I have a C7 box already with nginx, PostgreSQL, Sinatra and Ruby. So I don’t want to install PHP, Apache, MySQL, etc.

Are there any ways/tutorials to set up a mail server under those restrictions? It would serve multiple domains.

Cheers, Bee

Re: email Server for CentOS 7

By Promise Kumalo at 09/30/2018 - 08:54

try "free" linux groupware like Kolab, Citadel or Zimbra. they will give
you easy installation and easy user/mailbox management.

On 09/30/2018 12:51 AM, Bee.Lists wrote:

Re: email Server for CentOS 7

By Chris at 10/08/2018 - 00:17

On Sun, 30 Sep 2018 12:54:59 +0000

SOGo is also not bad.

Furthermore, there are Horde, eGroupware, Kopano, Tine.

- Chris

Re: email Server for CentOS 7

By Mark Rousell at 09/29/2018 - 18:41

On 29/09/2018 21:51, Bee.Lists wrote:
Have a look at this tutorial: 'How to set up a mail server on a GNU /
Linux system' < <a href="http://flurdy.com/docs/postfix/" title="http://flurdy.com/docs/postfix/">http://flurdy.com/docs/postfix/</a> >

It focuses on Ubuntu but much should apply to CentOS too. (By the way,
does anyone know of a CentOS-centric tutorial covering the same subject?).

As others have said, running a mail server is not easy today (major
issues are (a) preventing spam distribution and, increasingly, (b)
deliverability to major email providers even if you have done nothing
wrong) but this is a technical mailing list for people who have
deliberately chosen to run CentOS. We all have to start somewhere and
this is as good a place as anywhere. But be aware that running a mail
server is a big commitment to time and maintenance.

Re: email Server for CentOS 7

By John R. Dennison at 09/29/2018 - 17:58

On Sat, Sep 29, 2018 at 04:51:07PM -0400, Bee.Lists wrote:
Save yourself the effort, time, headaches and eventual bloody tears of impotent
rage and just go with Google or some other provider. Running a mail
server properly is one of the more difficult tasks and quite often not
worth the time and trouble, especially if one is asking about it on a
list such as this.

John

Re: email Server for CentOS 7

By Peter Eckel at 10/01/2018 - 11:37

I fully agree with most of the former, except for the Google part. Google is to privacy what a shark pool is to a carp. If possible, avoid Google at all cost, and particularly for E-Mail. There are services around that cost a very small amount of money (e.g. mailbox.org or posteo.de), provide a very reasonable service and do *not* peek into your mail for advertisement targets and sell your data to their customers.

If you want to run your own mail server (there are good reasons to do so, I've been running my own services for many years now) be prepared for a learning curve, as mail is not as simple and straightforward as it looks. You should also run your own DNS in that case, as many modern features of secure mail services are tightly linked to DNS (e.g. SPF, DKIM, DMARC etc.). DNSsec is preferred.

There are some good books around (e.g. the Postfix/Dovecot books by Peer Heinlein, who incidentally is the owner of the mailbox.org service, but the Postfix book only seems to be available in German). Without a good foundation on running mail servers and/or some help from experienced mail server operators you're almost certain to screw up big time, which in most cases means ending up on some blacklists or having mail delivered very unreliably.

As for the software question, I recommend the Postfix/Dovecot setup, enriched with some additional components to support graylisting, virus checking, spam filtering, DKIM, DMARC and SPF.

Pete.

Re: email Server for CentOS 7

By Johnny Hughes v... at 10/01/2018 - 16:10

Am 01.10.2018 um 17:37 schrieb Peter Eckel <lists@eckel-edv.de>:
...
and for the sake of completeness; another acronym MTA-STS,
a new additional standard <a href="https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc8461" title="https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc8461">https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc8461</a>

Re: email Server for CentOS 7

By Bee.Lists at 10/01/2018 - 14:31

Thank you for the input. And to the others as well. I hate this type of chase where it seems never-ending, for a technology I can’t stand. Managing my current solution has been a problem for ages. I’m not getting any younger. Maybe hosting is the best solution, and I do agree with you about Google. I don’t trust them as far as I can spit.

Cheers, Bee

Re: email Server for CentOS 7

By Kenneth Porter at 10/01/2018 - 12:54

--On Monday, October 01, 2018 6:37 PM +0200 Peter Eckel

Fastmail looks attractive to me as it's IMAP-friendly. I run my own server
but I'm recommending to my family that they move their accounts there if I
"get hit by a bus".

<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FastMail>

I mostly run my own server because it's easy to create an infinite number
of disposable "plussed" addresses as website login names. I've got a
sendmail rule that lets me use a dot instead of a plus sign in such
addresses to get around the websites that refuse a plus sign in an address.

<http://mozilla.wikia.com/wiki/User:Me_at_work/plushaters>

This can be split. I let my hosting provider host my public domain name on
their DNS servers. But I run a caching nameserver on my mail server to do
the various lookups it requires. A forwarding nameserver for blacklist
lookups is NOT recommended because of the way the various DNS-based
blacklisting databases license their service.

Re: email Server for CentOS 7

By Rainer Duffner at 10/01/2018 - 16:45

I run my own mail-server on FreeBSD and qmail (setup mostly using a script from Matt Simerson: <a href="https://github.com/msimerson/Mail-Toaster-6" title="https://github.com/msimerson/Mail-Toaster-6">https://github.com/msimerson/Mail-Toaster-6</a>).
I need to re-do it at some point.

I’m always debating moving to Zimbra (OpenSource Edition, or Zimbra Suite).

If I wouldn’t run my own, I’d probably switch to Protonmail.
Fastmail is also an option.

DNS (authority) is best run at your hosting-provider or even at a specialized DNS provider, depending on requirements.

Everything else is just asking for trouble.

Re: email Server for CentOS 7

By Scott Robbins at 10/01/2018 - 13:30

On Mon, Oct 01, 2018 at 09:54:01AM -0700, Kenneth Porter wrote:
We migrated over 100 users to fastmail with almost no complaints.

Re: email Server for CentOS 7

By Mikhail Utin at 10/01/2018 - 12:11

I would repeat my opinion that Sendmail and similar servers are not for easy to install and use. here is the link to Surgemail:
<a href="https://netwinsite.com/cgi-bin/keycgi.exe?cmd=download&amp;product=surgemail&amp;" title="https://netwinsite.com/cgi-bin/keycgi.exe?cmd=download&amp;product=surgemail&amp;">https://netwinsite.com/cgi-bin/keycgi.exe?cmd=download&amp;product=surgemail&amp;</a>

I'm not promoting but simply years of good work.

Mikhail Utin

I fully agree with most of the former, except for the Google part. Google is to privacy what a shark pool is to a carp. If possible, avoid Google at all cost, and particularly for E-Mail. There are services around that cost a very small amount of money (e.g. mailbox.org or posteo.de), provide a very reasonable service and do *not* peek into your mail for advertisement targets and sell your data to their customers.

If you want to run your own mail server (there are good reasons to do so, I've been running my own services for many years now) be prepared for a learning curve, as mail is not as simple and straightforward as it looks. You should also run your own DNS in that case, as many modern features of secure mail services are tightly linked to DNS (e.g. SPF, DKIM, DMARC etc.). DNSsec is preferred.

There are some good books around (e.g. the Postfix/Dovecot books by Peer Heinlein, who incidentally is the owner of the mailbox.org service, but the Postfix book only seems to be available in German). Without a good foundation on running mail servers and/or some help from experienced mail server operators you're almost certain to screw up big time, which in most cases means ending up on some blacklists or having mail delivered very unreliably.

As for the software question, I recommend the Postfix/Dovecot setup, enriched with some additional components to support graylisting, virus checking, spam filtering, DKIM, DMARC and SPF.

Pete.

Re: email Server for CentOS 7

By Kenneth Porter at 09/29/2018 - 17:44

Read up on Postfix (SMTP) and Dovecot (POP3 and IMAP). (Sendmail is
available as an alternative to Postfix.)

Additional services you'll want include MIMEDefang (general filter
management), SpamAssassin (anti-spam), and ClamAV (anti-virus scanning).

Other useful services include OpenDKIM (validates that mail really came
from the domain it claims to have come from), Roundcube (web-based email
client), and Certbot (acquire a LetsEncrypt cert for your mail servers).
You might want OpenLDAP for authentication, identity management, and
address books. Fail2ban can help keep the script kiddies out of your
services.

Running a mail server requires knowledge of many different services and
awareness of many security issues. You have your work cut out for you.