DevHeads.net

Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

Dear all,

I am trying once again, something that I have not succeeded in doing. I have tried before:

<a href="http://marc.info/?l=fedora-list&amp;m=112527669314098&amp;w=4" title="http://marc.info/?l=fedora-list&amp;m=112527669314098&amp;w=4">http://marc.info/?l=fedora-list&amp;m=112527669314098&amp;w=4</a>

Now I am at it again, this time, I want to succeed. I have read the documentation again and I can't succeed, I have tried copying different /etc/dhcpcd.conf files from different places, but not working

I copied over the sample from

<a href="http://www.redhatmagazine.com/2008/08/05/linux-dhcp-server-static-ips-are-gone-in-60-seconds/" title="http://www.redhatmagazine.com/2008/08/05/linux-dhcp-server-static-ips-are-gone-in-60-seconds/">http://www.redhatmagazine.com/2008/08/05/linux-dhcp-server-static-ips-ar...</a>

and I did not succeed, then I copied the one in
usr/share/doc/dhcp-3.0.5/dhcpd.conf.sample

but I still fail. I have two nic's one from the motherboard and a different one(PCI)

[root@localhost ~]# lspci
00:00.0 Host bridge: nVidia Corporation nForce2 IGP2 (rev a2)
00:00.1 RAM memory: nVidia Corporation nForce2 Memory Controller 1 (rev a2)
00:00.2 RAM memory: nVidia Corporation nForce2 Memory Controller 4 (rev a2)
00:00.3 RAM memory: nVidia Corporation nForce2 Memory Controller 3 (rev a2)
00:00.4 RAM memory: nVidia Corporation nForce2 Memory Controller 2 (rev a2)
00:00.5 RAM memory: nVidia Corporation nForce2 Memory Controller 5 (rev a2)
00:01.0 ISA bridge: nVidia Corporation nForce2 ISA Bridge (rev a4)
00:01.1 SMBus: nVidia Corporation nForce2 SMBus (MCP) (rev a2)
00:02.0 USB Controller: nVidia Corporation nForce2 USB Controller (rev a4)
00:02.1 USB Controller: nVidia Corporation nForce2 USB Controller (rev a4)
00:02.2 USB Controller: nVidia Corporation nForce2 USB Controller (rev a4)
00:04.0 Ethernet controller: nVidia Corporation nForce2 Ethernet Controller (rev a1)
00:06.0 Multimedia audio controller: nVidia Corporation nForce2 AC97 Audio Controler (MCP) (rev a1)
00:08.0 PCI bridge: nVidia Corporation nForce2 External PCI Bridge (rev a3)
00:09.0 IDE interface: nVidia Corporation nForce2 IDE (rev a2)
00:1e.0 PCI bridge: nVidia Corporation nForce2 AGP (rev a2)
01:08.0 Ethernet controller: 3Com Corporation 3c905 100BaseTX [Boomerang]
02:00.0 VGA compatible controller: nVidia Corporation NV34 [GeForce FX 5200] (rev a1)
[root@localhost network-scripts]# ifconfig -a
eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:0E:A6:42:59:AF
inet addr:10.154.19.210 Bcast:10.154.19.255 Mask:255.255.255.0
inet6 addr: fe80::20e:a6ff:fe42:59af/64 Scope:Link
UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
RX packets:19576 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:12673 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
RX bytes:12621674 (12.0 MiB) TX bytes:2753082 (2.6 MiB)
Interrupt:22 Base address:0x6000

eth1 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:60:97:C5:2A:C3
inet6 addr: fe80::260:97ff:fec5:2ac3/64 Scope:Link
UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:10 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
RX bytes:0 (0.0 b) TX bytes:1836 (1.7 KiB)
Interrupt:18 Base address:0xdf00

lo Link encap:Local Loopback
inet addr:127.0.0.1 Mask:255.0.0.0
inet6 addr: ::1/128 Scope:Host
UP LOOPBACK RUNNING MTU:16436 Metric:1
RX packets:40 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:40 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:0
RX bytes:2264 (2.2 KiB) TX bytes:2264 (2.2 KiB)

pan0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr AA:FA:32:AC:03:01
BROADCAST MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:0
RX bytes:0 (0.0 b) TX bytes:0 (0.0 b)

00:04.0 Ethernet controller: nVidia Corporation ===> eth0
01:08.0 Ethernet controller: 3Com Corporation 3c905 100BaseTX [Boomerang] ===> eth1

I am running Fedora 10 Preview updated to latest. I have

[root@localhost ~]# rpm -qa dhcp*
dhcpv6-client-1.0.22-1.fc10.i386
dhcp-4.0.0-30.fc10.i386
[root@localhost ~]#

I have read the howto's from here:

<a href="http://www.linuxhomenetworking.com/wiki/index.php/Quick_HOWTO_:_Ch08_:_Configuring_the_DHCP_Server" title="http://www.linuxhomenetworking.com/wiki/index.php/Quick_HOWTO_:_Ch08_:_Configuring_the_DHCP_Server">http://www.linuxhomenetworking.com/wiki/index.php/Quick_HOWTO_:_Ch08_:_C...</a>

and

<a href="http://www.howtoforge.com/perfect-server-fedora9" title="http://www.howtoforge.com/perfect-server-fedora9">http://www.howtoforge.com/perfect-server-fedora9</a>

as well as the article in Red Hat Magazine. In looking at the troubleshooting, I see

[root@localhost ~]# service dhcpd start
Starting dhcpd: [FAILED]
[root@localhost ~]# /usr/sbin/dhcpd -t -cf /etc/dhcpd.conf
Internet Systems Consortium DHCP Server 4.0.0
Copyright 2004-2007 Internet Systems Consortium.
All rights reserved.
For info, please visit <a href="http://www.isc.org/sw/dhcp/" title="http://www.isc.org/sw/dhcp/">http://www.isc.org/sw/dhcp/</a>
Not searching LDAP since ldap-server, ldap-port and ldap-base-dn were not specified in the config file
[root@localhost ~]# dhcpd -f
Internet Systems Consortium DHCP Server 4.0.0
Copyright 2004-2007 Internet Systems Consortium.
All rights reserved.
For info, please visit <a href="http://www.isc.org/sw/dhcp/" title="http://www.isc.org/sw/dhcp/">http://www.isc.org/sw/dhcp/</a>
Not searching LDAP since ldap-server, ldap-port and ldap-base-dn were not specified in the config file
Wrote 0 class decls to leases file.
Wrote 0 deleted host decls to leases file.
Wrote 0 new dynamic host decls to leases file.
Wrote 0 leases to leases file.

No subnet declaration for eth0 (10.154.19.210).
** Ignoring requests on eth0. If this is not what
you want, please write a subnet declaration
in your dhcpd.conf file for the network segment
to which interface eth0 is attached. **

Not configured to listen on any interfaces!

This version of ISC DHCP is based on the release available
on ftp.isc.org. Features have been added and other changes
have been made to the base software release in order to make
it work better with this distribution.

Please report for this software via the Red Hat Bugzilla site:
<a href="http://bugzilla.redhat.com" title="http://bugzilla.redhat.com">http://bugzilla.redhat.com</a>

exiting.

[root@localhost ~]# cat /etc/dhcpd.conf
# dhcpd.conf
#
# Sample configuration file for ISC dhcpd
#

# option definitions common to all supported networks...
option domain-name "example.org";
option domain-name-servers ns1.example.org, ns2.example.org;

default-lease-time 600;
max-lease-time 7200;

# Use this to enble / disable dynamic dns updates globally.
#ddns-update-style none;

# If this DHCP server is the official DHCP server for the local
# network, the authoritative directive should be uncommented.
#authoritative;

# Use this to send dhcp log messages to a different log file (you also
# have to hack syslog.conf to complete the redirection).
log-facility local7;

# No service will be given on this subnet, but declaring it helps the
# DHCP server to understand the network topology.

subnet 10.152.187.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
}

# This is a very basic subnet declaration.

subnet 10.254.239.0 netmask 255.255.255.224 {
range 10.254.239.10 10.254.239.20;
option routers rtr-239-0-1.example.org, rtr-239-0-2.example.org;
}

# This declaration allows BOOTP clients to get dynamic addresses,
# which we don't really recommend.

subnet 10.254.239.32 netmask 255.255.255.224 {
range dynamic-bootp 10.254.239.40 10.254.239.60;
option broadcast-address 10.254.239.31;
option routers rtr-239-32-1.example.org;
}

# A slightly different configuration for an internal subnet.
subnet 10.5.5.0 netmask 255.255.255.224 {
range 10.5.5.26 10.5.5.30;
option domain-name-servers ns1.internal.example.org;
option domain-name "internal.example.org";
option routers 10.5.5.1;
option broadcast-address 10.5.5.31;
default-lease-time 600;
max-lease-time 7200;
}

# Hosts which require special configuration options can be listed in
# host statements. If no address is specified, the address will be
# allocated dynamically (if possible), but the host-specific information
# will still come from the host declaration.

host passacaglia {
hardware ethernet 0:0:c0:5d:bd:95;
filename "vmunix.passacaglia";
server-name "toccata.fugue.com";
}

# Fixed IP addresses can also be specified for hosts. These addresses
# should not also be listed as being available for dynamic assignment.
# Hosts for which fixed IP addresses have been specified can boot using
# BOOTP or DHCP. Hosts for which no fixed address is specified can only
# be booted with DHCP, unless there is an address range on the subnet
# to which a BOOTP client is connected which has the dynamic-bootp flag
# set.
host fantasia {
hardware ethernet 08:00:07:26:c0:a5;
fixed-address fantasia.fugue.com;
}

# You can declare a class of clients and then do address allocation
# based on that. The example below shows a case where all clients
# in a certain class get addresses on the 10.17.224/24 subnet, and all
# other clients get addresses on the 10.0.29/24 subnet.

class "foo" {
match if substring (option vendor-class-identifier, 0, 4) = "SUNW";
}

shared-network 224-29 {
subnet 10.17.224.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
option routers rtr-224.example.org;
}
subnet 10.0.29.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
option routers rtr-29.example.org;
}
pool {
allow members of "foo";
range 10.17.224.10 10.17.224.250;
}
pool {
deny members of "foo";
range 10.0.29.10 10.0.29.230;
}
}
[olivares@localhost ~]$ cat /etc/fedora-release
Fedora release 10 (Cambridge)
[olivares@localhost ~]$ uname -a
Linux localhost 2.6.27.5-109.fc10.i686 #1 SMP Thu Nov 13 21:01:50 EST 2008 i686athlon i386 GNU/Linux
[olivares@localhost ~]$

Thank you in Advance for advice, suggestions, howto's and guidance.

Regards,

Antonio

Comments

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Marko Vojinovic at 02/05/2009 - 23:05

Haven't read the whole thread, sorry, just the beggining. But I hope I didn't
miss much info. ;-)

The dhcpd configuration is highly network-dependent. You should never expect
that somebody else's dhcpd.conf will Just Work for you. It typically Just
Won't.

You have to understand what and how to configure and write your own
dhcpd.conf.

Ok. Which do you want to be used for what purpose? How are they connected to
outside world? What is your network topology? Try to think like this ---
there is generally the "up" network (the outside world, not to be served with
dhcpd) and "down" network (the local one, which should accept your dhcp
offers). How are these two connected to the interfaces?

I see no IPv4 information for eth1. Depending on your topology, you should
probably have it configured and up (with a static IP, if this is to be a link
to the "down" network).

I've never read those articles, nor I intend to fwiw. But more importantly,
have you read "man dhcpd" and "man dhcpd.conf"? Further, have you understood
what is said there? This is essential for correct dhcpd operation. The main
moral for servers: "Understand What You Are Doing".

If you need help on this, feel free to ask, or read some book on tcp/ip to
learn the details about network structure. That's what I did and have never
ever had any problems configuring dhcpd, since. :-)

Ok, so something is wrong. ;-)

[snip]

So, is this what you want, or not? You have to make it clear on what device
(eth0 or eth1 or both) the dhcpd will listen. Where is your "down" network
and where is the "up" one? Typically, you *do not* want to listen on the "up"
interface, and you *do* want to listen on the "down" interface.

[[ N.B. In some network setups, the "up" network may not even exist. In other
setups, you may want to listen on both "up" and "down" networks. You need to
specify what exactly you want to achieve. ]]

So this is why it fails. The dhcpd.conf file is not configured correctly (or
at all). Or the eth1 interface is not up and running (separate problem ---
configure it, check cables and such...). Or both.

Example dhcpd.conf files are mainly targeted for educational purposes, not
usability. Do not just copy-paste the example to /etc/dhcpd.conf and expect
that to work. The example is there to teach you syntax and typical
configuration, in order to help you write your own setup, not to substitute
that writing.

Is this your domain-name? I doubt. ;-) Fill in the real one. If you don't
know, ask your ISP, they should know. If they haven't given you one (typical
home-network dhcpd setup with a single link to outside), invent one. Do you
want/have a dns server working in your local network?

So, what are your domain-name servers? Ask your ISP and use theirs, if you do
not have a local dns. I usually put IP numbers here, not fqdn.

Ok, suit for yourself, adjust these as you wish.

Do you want dynamic updating of your local dns server? Probably not at this
stage, leave commented.

Is this going to be the official dhcpd server for your local network? If yes
(and I see no point in having the server if not), I guess you want this line
uncommented.

So, you want to log the server messages in a non-default way? Have you
customized the syslog.conf to match this (assuming this is really needed,
never did it myself)?

Ok, so any dhcp requests from this subnet will be ignored. What subnet do you
want to serve?

Btw, in order to help dhcpd to understand network topology, you should
definitely understand it yourself first. I can assume that you do, but
sharing the info with us is important if you want anyone to help you with the
configuration.

As it says, this is a very basic subnet definition. When a client asks for a
dhcp request, your dhcpd server will offer it an address from the above range
(typically going from .20 down to .10, ie. in reverse order...). Is this the
set of addresses you want the client to get and use? How many computers do
you expect to have on the network with dynamic IPs? Is it less than ten? Is
that enough for your purposes?

Do you actually use the .example.org routers? No? What is the fqdn of your
router then?

Is any of your client machines to be network-booted (ie. not from its own
hard-disk)? I have never needed this. Do you? If not, delete it (or comment
it out).

You have two different subnets on your local network? This is the (by now
famous) "topology question" :-) . How is your network organized? What is the
intention behind having two different subnets? Why do you want them to have
different parameters?

I repeat, this is *an example file*, I guess you really really don't need this
in real life as is written here. This is meant to *teach* you, not to be
*used*.

Do you expect to have a client machine with the MAC address 0:0:c0:5d:bd:95?
No? Why do you need this setting then?

Same as above.

Ok, now this really gets complicated. Do you know what this means? Do you need
it for your network? Why is it there?

Ok, I have a small home network for a couple of computers (at work I have a
large one with different pools, several servers, subnets and all, but I am
not at liberty to disclose that dhcpd.conf...). My home setup looks like
this:

[vmarko@TheSith ~]$ cat /etc/dhcpd.conf
# I have no dns here, nor need one atm. So no dynamic dns either:
ddns-update-style none;

# no dns means I don't what to honor client requests on updating it:
ignore client-updates;

# my net is not a part of some larger network, nor connected to
# the internet, so I invent a name for my domain, just for kicks:
option domain-name "homesweethome";

# Now, what and how to serve. I use the 10.* addresses.
# Why not? :-)
subnet 10.0.0.0 netmask 255.0.0.0
{
# this machine is to be a router if I ever want to connect to outside world:
option routers 10.0.0.1;
# the class A local network (why not?):
option subnet-mask 255.0.0.0;
# I have eight (3 to 10) possible IPs for dhcpd to serve. Do I need more?
# No. I have only four computers at home so far... Is a class A network
# a complete waste in this situation? Sure, but since I don't have a dns,
# I often have to type explicit IPs in command-line, and 10.0.0.* is the
# easiest to type... ;-)
range 10.0.0.3 10.0.0.10;
default-lease-time 21600;
max-lease-time 43200;
}

And that's it. It just works, for my needs. And this network is completely
off-line, in the sense that I have no "up" network (no connection to the
internet). If I get connected (using dial-up, sigh :-( ...), I do it with the
10.0.0.1 machine (the one hosting dhcpd among other things), and it is used
as a router for others.

For most elementary needs, you would probably not need anything more than
this. Maybe make the range more wide if you have lots of clients.

For more advanced setups, you need more advanced configuration. But always,
and I mean **always**, configure dhcpd.conf yourself to suit *your* needs and
*your* network. The "Understand What You Are Doing" philosophy... ;-)

HTH, :-)
Marko

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Sam Varshavchik at 02/05/2009 - 23:04

Antonio Olivares writes:

Your eth0 has ip 10.154.19.210

dhcpd is telling you, right here, what's broken.

What's this? Your eth0's IP address is 10.154.19.210. You need remove all
subnet declarations in dhcp.conf, and provide a subnet declaration for
10.154.19.0/24

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Antonio Olivares at 02/05/2009 - 23:04

Ok,
I changed the /etc/dhcpd.conf

and I get [root@localhost ~]# dhcpd -f
Internet Systems Consortium DHCP Server 4.0.0
Copyright 2004-2007 Internet Systems Consortium.
All rights reserved.
For info, please visit <a href="http://www.isc.org/sw/dhcp/" title="http://www.isc.org/sw/dhcp/">http://www.isc.org/sw/dhcp/</a>
Warning: subnet 10.154.19.0/27 overlaps subnet 10.154.19.0/24
Not searching LDAP since ldap-server, ldap-port and ldap-base-dn were not specified in the config file
Wrote 0 leases to leases file.
Listening on LPF/eth0/00:0e:a6:42:59:af/10.154.19.0/24
Sending on LPF/eth0/00:0e:a6:42:59:af/10.154.19.0/24
Sending on Socket/fallback/fallback-net
^C
[root@localhost ~]# service dhcpd start
Starting dhcpd: [FAILED]
[root@localhost ~]# service dhcpd stop
[root@localhost ~]# service dhcpd start
Starting dhcpd: [FAILED]
[root@localhost ~]# dhcpd -f
Internet Systems Consortium DHCP Server 4.0.0
Copyright 2004-2007 Internet Systems Consortium.
All rights reserved.
For info, please visit <a href="http://www.isc.org/sw/dhcp/" title="http://www.isc.org/sw/dhcp/">http://www.isc.org/sw/dhcp/</a>
Warning: subnet 10.154.19.0/27 overlaps subnet 10.154.19.0/24
Not searching LDAP since ldap-server, ldap-port and ldap-base-dn were not specified in the config file
Wrote 0 leases to leases file.
Listening on LPF/eth0/00:0e:a6:42:59:af/10.154.19.0/24
Sending on LPF/eth0/00:0e:a6:42:59:af/10.154.19.0/24
Sending on Socket/fallback/fallback-net

but service still fails :(

[root@localhost ~]# service dhcpd start
Starting dhcpd: [FAILED]
[root@localhost ~]# service dhcpd stop
[root@localhost ~]# service dhcpd start
Starting dhcpd: [FAILED]

Here's file:

[root@localhost ~]# cat /etc/dhcpd.conf
# dhcpd.conf
#
# Sample configuration file for ISC dhcpd
#

# option definitions common to all supported networks...
option domain-name "example.org";
option domain-name-servers ns1.example.org, ns2.example.org;

default-lease-time 600;
max-lease-time 7200;

# Use this to enble / disable dynamic dns updates globally.
#ddns-update-style none;

# If this DHCP server is the official DHCP server for the local
# network, the authoritative directive should be uncommented.
authoritative;

# Use this to send dhcp log messages to a different log file (you also
# have to hack syslog.conf to complete the redirection).
log-facility local7;

# No service will be given on this subnet, but declaring it helps the
# DHCP server to understand the network topology.

subnet 10.154.19.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
}

# This is a very basic subnet declaration.

subnet 10.154.19.0 netmask 255.255.255.224 {
range 10.154.19.10 10.154.19.20;
option routers rtr-239-0-1.example.org, rtr-239-0-2.example.org;
}

Thank you for helping out!

Antonio

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Tim at 02/05/2009 - 23:04

It seems pointlessly redundant to declare a subnet twice. And stranger
to declare it differently. I see no point for the first one.

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Antonio Olivares at 02/05/2009 - 23:04

Which one should I keep Tim, the first one or the second one?

I have tried before and not succeeded, I want to succeed this time.

The machine that will become the server has gateway 10.154.19.1, is it okay to make the server
10.154.19.0 ?

Also the machine's netmask is 255.255.255.0 and the netmask of the server should it be 255.255.255.0 or 255.255.255.254 or other thing?

Thanks,

Antonio

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Tim at 02/05/2009 - 23:05

Antonio Olivares:

I believe my last sentence should have answered that.

Addresses ending with zero or 255 (x.y.z.0 and x.y.z.255) are generally
regarded as special purpose addresses, and machines would normally be
assigned addresses from 1 to 254 as the last quad.

It's not a hard and fast rule, there are exceptions. But some things
make assumptions, and get their knickers in a twist if you try to do
otherwise.

There's two conventions of using the .1 or .254 address for your
router/gateway, but that's just a convention, and about the only thing
that insisted on one of them was the *old* Windows internet connection
sharing, that insisted on using 192.168.0.1 for the gateway PC.

If everything is actually on the same subnet (e.g, they're wired
together through a switch or router, and they can all connect to each
other without having to go through a gateway) then they should all have
the same netmask. For the average home network, using 192.168.x.y
addressing, then the 255.255.255.0 netmask suffices.

If there are separate physical networks, or you have some need to carve
up how you're using it, then you can use more restrictive netmasks, and
you may have to, for those networks to work (they need to know the
boundary between the same network and the outside network, so they can
make connections to the outside one through the gateway between them).

I would suggest that whatever PC you're running the DHCP server on
should have a fixed IP address, and for that to be fixed in your network
configuration, not trying to get the DHCP server to set its own IP
address. This, probably, also means ensuring that the NetworkManager
service is turned off, and the older network service is used.

My DHCP server still runs on a Fedora Core 4 box, and I have no
parameters set into it for what interface it listens to, there's only
one network interface on the box.

My working /etc/dhcp.conf file is below, with example.com being used as
an example domain name. It has more options than you'd need, and some
you probably should remove.

authoritative;

include "/etc/rndc.key";
# (This is the same key used by BIND and the rndc tool, it's needed to
# be able to update DNS records.)

# Server configuration:
ddns-domainname "example.com.";
ddns-rev-domainname "in-addr.arpa.";
ddns-update-style interim;
ddns-updates on;
allow client-updates;

default-lease-time 21600; # 6 hours
max-lease-time 43200; # 12 hours

# Client configuration:
option domain-name "example.com.";
option pop-server pop3.example.com;
option smtp-server smtp.example.com;
option wpad-curl code 252 = text;
option wpad-curl "http://proxy.example.com/wpad.dat";
option www-server <a href="http://www.example.com;" title="www.example.com;">www.example.com;</a>
option ntp-servers time.example.com;
#option time-offset 34200; # Australian Central Standard Time
option time-offset 37800; # Central Australia Daylight Time

option ip-forwarding off; # tell clients not to act as gateways (?)

subnet 192.168.0.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {

range 192.168.0.100 192.168.0.200; # allocate IPs within this range

option routers 192.168.0.1; # default gateway
option subnet-mask 255.255.255.0;
option broadcast-address 192.168.0.255;
option domain-name-servers 192.168.0.1;

option netbios-name-servers 192.168.0.1; # WINS
option netbios-dd-server 192.168.0.1; # SMB
option netbios-node-type 8;
option netbios-scope "";

option finger-server 192.168.0.1;

zone 0.168.192.in-addr.arpa. {
primary 192.168.0.1;
key rndckey;
}

zone example.com. {
primary 192.168.0.1;
key rndckey;
}
}

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By edwardspl at 02/05/2009 - 23:04

Dear You,

Please try these :

<>subnet 10.154.19.0 netmask 255.255.255.224
{
range 10.154.19.10 10.154.19.20;
option routers rtr-239-0-1.example.org,rtr-239-0-2.example.org;
}

Good luck !

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Antonio Olivares at 02/05/2009 - 23:04

I tried that and it does not work :(

[root@localhost ~]# cat /etc/dhcpd.conf
# dhcpd.conf
#
# Sample configuration file for ISC dhcpd
#

# option definitions common to all supported networks...
#option domain-name "example.org";
#option domain-name-servers ns1.example.org, ns2.example.org;

default-lease-time 600;
max-lease-time 7200;

# Use this to enble / disable dynamic dns updates globally.
ddns-update-style none;

# If this DHCP server is the official DHCP server for the local
# network, the authoritative directive should be uncommented.
authoritative;

# Use this to send dhcp log messages to a different log file (you also
# have to hack syslog.conf to complete the redirection).
log-facility local7;

# No service will be given on this subnet, but declaring it helps the
# DHCP server to understand the network topology.

#subnet 10.154.19.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
#}

# This is a very basic subnet declaration.

subnet 10.154.19.0 netmask 255.255.255.224 {
range 10.154.19.10 10.154.19.20;
option routers rtr-239-0-1.example.org, rtr-239-0-2.example.org;
}

[root@localhost ~]# dhcpd -f
Internet Systems Consortium DHCP Server 4.0.0
Copyright 2004-2007 Internet Systems Consortium.
All rights reserved.
For info, please visit <a href="http://www.isc.org/sw/dhcp/" title="http://www.isc.org/sw/dhcp/">http://www.isc.org/sw/dhcp/</a>
Not searching LDAP since ldap-server, ldap-port and ldap-base-dn were not specified in the config file
Wrote 0 leases to leases file.

No subnet declaration for eth0 (10.154.19.210).
** Ignoring requests on eth0. If this is not what
you want, please write a subnet declaration
in your dhcpd.conf file for the network segment
to which interface eth0 is attached. **

Not configured to listen on any interfaces!

This version of ISC DHCP is based on the release available
on ftp.isc.org. Features have been added and other changes
have been made to the base software release in order to make
it work better with this distribution.

Please report for this software via the Red Hat Bugzilla site:
<a href="http://bugzilla.redhat.com" title="http://bugzilla.redhat.com">http://bugzilla.redhat.com</a>

exiting.

I also have added to iptables two lines and ran iptables-save

when I read the following:
upon reading another page:
<a href="http://chwang.blogspot.com/2007/11/making-linux-fedora-core-8-as-gateway.html" title="http://chwang.blogspot.com/2007/11/making-linux-fedora-core-8-as-gateway.html">http://chwang.blogspot.com/2007/11/making-linux-fedora-core-8-as-gateway...</a>

it says iptables and has this part:

# Forward all packets from eth1 (internal network) to eth0 (the public internet)
iptables -A FORWARD -i eth1 -o eth0 -j ACCEPT
# Forward packets that are part of existing and related connections from eth0 to eth1
iptables -A FORWARD -i eth0 -o eth1 -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT
# Enable SNAT functionality on eth0. a.b.c.d are generally the ip of the eth0
iptables -A POSTROUTING -t nat -s 192.168.1.0/24 -o eth0 -j SNAT --to-source a.

Added ===> iptables -A FORWARD -i eth1 -o eth0 -j ACCEPT
and ===> iptables -A FORWARD -i eth0 -o eth1 -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT

Did not add SNAT, does that make a difference?

[root@localhost ~]# iptables-save
# Generated by iptables-save v1.4.1.1 on Sat Nov 15 11:42:58 2008
*filter
:INPUT ACCEPT [0:0]
:FORWARD ACCEPT [0:0]
:OUTPUT ACCEPT [59634:9393428]
:RH-Firewall-1-INPUT - [0:0]
-A INPUT -j RH-Firewall-1-INPUT
-A FORWARD -j REJECT --reject-with icmp-host-prohibited
-A FORWARD -i eth1 -o eth0 -j ACCEPT
-A FORWARD -i eth0 -o eth1 -m state --state RELATED,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -i lo -j ACCEPT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -p icmp -m icmp --icmp-type any -j ACCEPT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -p esp -j ACCEPT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -p ah -j ACCEPT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -d 224.0.0.251/32 -p udp -m udp --dport 5353 -j ACCEPT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -p udp -m udp --dport 631 -j ACCEPT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -p tcp -m tcp --dport 631 -j ACCEPT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -m state --state RELATED,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -p tcp -m state --state NEW -m tcp --dport 22 -j ACCEPT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -j REJECT --reject-with icmp-host-prohibited
COMMIT
# Completed on Sat Nov 15 11:42:58 2008

Thanks,

Antonio

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Craig White at 02/05/2009 - 23:04

default-lease-time 600;
max-lease-time 7200;
ddns-update-style none;
authoritative;
log-facility local7;
subnet 10.154.19.0 netmask 255.255.255.224 {
range 10.154.19.10 10.154.19.20;
option domain-name-servers $DNS_SERVER_IP_ADDRESS_1, $DNS_SERVER_IP_ADDRESS_2;
option domain-name "$YOUR_DOMAIN_NAME";
option broadcast-address 10.154.19.31;
option subnet-mask 255.255.255.224;
option routers 10.154.19.1 ; # just a guess
ddns-updates off;
}

/etc/sysconfig/dhcpd

DHCPDARGS=eth0 # recommended

# other things to note...default and max lease times are really short. Many more options can be added such as WINS, NTP servers, etc.

Webmin (<a href="http://www.webmin.com" title="http://www.webmin.com">http://www.webmin.com</a>) makes a lot of this very trivial

Craig

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Craig White at 02/05/2009 - 23:04

eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:0E:A6:42:59:AF
inet addr:10.154.19.210 Bcast:10.154.19.255
Mask:255.255.255.0

the class C subnet means that my broadcast address and subnet masks
should match these above.

Craig

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Antonio Olivares at 02/05/2009 - 23:04

Thank you Craig for your input, I will change this on Monday and test it out.

So
subnet 10.154.19.0 netmask 255.255.255.254 {

should be changed to
==> subnet 10.154.19.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {

range 10.154.19.10 10.154.19.20;
option domain-name-servers $DNS_SERVER_IP_ADDRESS_1, $DNS_SERVER_IP_ADDRESS_2;
option domain-name "$YOUR_DOMAIN_NAME";

option broadcast-address 10.154.19.31; to
option broadcast-address 10.154.19.255;

for $DNS_SERVER_IP_ADDRESS_1, $DNS_SERVER_IP_ADDRESS_2 should it I leave them as is or do I put the ones that are on the host machine? or will it pick them up automagically?

Do I need to have bind running as well?

Sorry to ask too many questions. Last time I was trying this, I tried webmin, but I got confused with iptables and other little things. Will the iptables part that I put in suffice also.

Thank you for your time and advice. When I get back to work on Monday, I will try these suggestions and post back if I succeed or still have questions.

Regards,

Antonio

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Craig White at 02/05/2009 - 23:05

No - you don't need bind to run unless you want to provide DNS services.

You really need to understand networking basics...i.e. TCP/IP. One you
understand network address, broadcast address, subnet mask stuff, DHCP
is pretty easy. If you don't understand that stuff, you really don't
want to run a DHCP or BIND server and would be better off buying a
router type of appliance that will do that for you.

Craig

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Tim at 02/05/2009 - 23:05

There are advantages in doing so, but I'd learn how to do DHCP, then
learn the next thing.

With a local DHCP and DNS server, particular if they talk to each other,
you simplify client network configuration. Your DHCP server assigns
them addresses, and your DNS server reseolves all their addresses. You
don't need to play with hosts files on each PC, nor any other part of
their network configuration, it's all centrally managed. For anything
more than a three PC LAN, it soon gets annoying if you have to keep
updating all their hosts files.

As Craig said, it can be simpler to use something that does that for
you, such as a modem/router with its own DHCP server, there's far less
things for you to have to configure. But, any of the ones that I've
looked at, don't act as a local DNS server for their own DHCP records.
So, you're stuck with fixing IPs in its DHCP server, then messing with
hosts files on each PC.

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Antonio Olivares at 02/05/2009 - 23:06

I am working on it, but without success :(

I have installed webmin and made the corresponding changes that were suggested

[root@localhost ~]# cd /home/olivares/Downloads/
[root@localhost Downloads]# rpm -ivh webmin-1.441-1.noarch.rpm
Preparing... ########################################### [100%]
Operating system is Redhat Linux
1:webmin ########################################### [100%]
Webmin install complete. You can now login to <a href="https://localhost:10000/" title="https://localhost:10000/">https://localhost:10000/</a>
as root with your root password.
[root@localhost Downloads]# cat /etc/dhcpd.conf
default-lease-time 21600; #600
max-lease-time 43200; #7200
ddns-update-style none;
authoritative;
log-facility local7;
subnet 10.154.19.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
range 10.154.19.1 10.154.19.20;
}

I changed DHCPDARG=eth0 as was suggested, but not working.

Nov 16 12:39:06 localhost dhcpd: of the dhcpd.conf file.
Nov 16 12:39:09 localhost dhcpd: DHCPINFORM from 10.154.19.11 via eth0: not authoritative for subnet 10.154.19.0
Nov 16 12:39:30 localhost dhcpd: DHCPINFORM from 10.154.19.117 via eth0: not authoritative for subnet 10.154.19.0
Nov 16 12:43:56 localhost dhcpd: DHCPINFORM from 10.154.19.246 via eth0: not authoritative for subnet 10.154.19.0
Nov 16 12:44:01 localhost dhcpd: DHCPINFORM from 10.154.19.246 via eth0: not authoritative for subnet 10.154.19.0
Nov 16 12:45:44 localhost dhcpd: DHCPINFORM from 10.154.19.19 via eth0: not authoritative for subnet 10.154.19.0
Nov 16 12:45:47 localhost dhcpd: DHCPINFORM from 10.154.19.19 via eth0: not authoritative for subnet 10.154.19.0
Nov 16 12:53:50 localhost dhcpd: DHCPINFORM from 10.154.19.235 via eth0: not authoritative for subnet 10.154.19.0
Nov 16 13:03:04 localhost dhcpd: DHCPINFORM from 10.154.19.227 via eth0: not authoritative for subnet 10.154.19.0
Nov 16 13:03:07 localhost dhcpd: DHCPINFORM from 10.154.19.227 via eth0: not authoritative for subnet 10.154.19.0
Nov 16 13:03:44 localhost dhcpd: DHCPINFORM from 10.154.19.33 via eth0: not authoritative for subnet 10.154.19.0
Nov 16 13:03:47 localhost dhcpd: DHCPINFORM from 10.154.19.33 via eth0: not authoritative for subnet 10.154.19.0
Nov 16 13:08:24 localhost kernel: Kernel logging (proc) stopped.

The original machine gets its ip from a central server and then I want to use it as a server for several machines in my classroom.

It connects to 10.154.19.210 which is its address in the "BIG" network. it gets DNS 10.154.16.130, 10.128.0.4 and gateway 10.154.19.1

I have been playing with webmin, but either I get [FAILED] messages or it appears to work, but the machines cannot connect to it, or get their own IPs.

Thank you for hanging in there with me.

Antonio

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Marko Vojinovic at 02/05/2009 - 23:06

Antonio and others, I'm writing the stuff below off the top of my head ---
please feel free to correct me if necessarry, I may have slipped here or
there... ;-)

I missed this part. Where did you put this?

Ok. I suggest the following setup. Get the cable coming from the "big" network
and plug it into your eth0. Then, take a small hub/switch/router/whatever and
connect your classroom computers to it (I guess this is already set up). Make
sure that *no* cable connects your hub to the "big" network. Instead, connect
the hub to the eth1 of your server. Your server should be the only link
between the big network and classroom network.

Leave eth0 configuration for later.

Configure eth1 device to have a *static* (manually assigned) IP address,
say, 192.168.0.1 with netmask 255.255.255.0 and bring it up. Do this using
"system-config-network" interface and running "service network restart". Make
sure there is nothing related to NetworkManager active in the setup.

Next, configure dhcpd.conf in the following (most elementary) way, for the
time being:

###########################
default-lease-time 21600; #600
max-lease-time 43200; #7200
ddns-update-style none;
authoritative;

subnet 10.154.19.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
} # this means don't do anything with the big network

subnet 192.168.0.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
option routers 192.168.0.1 # your server is the router for classroom
option subnet-mask 255.255.255.0 # the mask given to classroom
option domain-name-servers 10.154.16.130, 10.128.0.4; # dns servers
range 192.168.0.2 192.168.0.254 # the pool of addresses for classroom
}
###########################

Save, do a "service dhcpd restart" (it should say OK), then
"tail -f /var/log/messages" and watch what is going on. Restart the clients
(one by one if you wish to examine /var/log/messages after each client,
otherwise you may restart them all simultaneously :-)...).

[[ N.B. I suppose you have configured the clients to use dhcp and not have
anything statically assigned... ]]

What should be going on is that the clients in the classroom ask for IP
configuration (dhcp request), then dhcpd replies with the data above (dhcp
offer) and then each client accepts this offer. If all goes well, up to this
point each client should have a 192.168.0.* IP assigned dynamically, and be
able to ping any other client with such address, as well as the server,
192.168.0.1. If this doesn't happen, tell us what does happen.

If all is well, up to now you have a working dhcpd configuration and each
client has an IP assigned. In /var/lib/dhcp/dhcpd.leases you have a list
stating which client (distinguished by its MAC address) has which IP assigned
to it. The leases file may have some stale/old/obsolete information (because
you have been playing with dhcpd before) --- ignore it, look at the bottom of
the file, where fresh information is stored.

The next step is to configure NAT (network address translation) on your
server's firewall, in order to allow the clients to access the "big" network
using your server as a router. But this is a different problem --- first make
sure the above configuration works, and then we'll go to the NAT
configuration after that. One step at a time. ;-)

HTH, :-)
Marko

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Antonio Olivares at 02/05/2009 - 23:06

I did as you suggested and I still cannot connect the machines to the new server :(

/etc/dhcpd.conf

default-lease-time 21600; #600
max-lease-time 43200; #7200
ddns-update-style none;
authoritative;

subnet 10.154.19.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
} # this means don't do anything with the big network

subnet 192.168.0.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
option routers 192.168.0.1; # your server is the router for classroom
option subnet-mask 255.255.255.0; # the mask given to classroom
option domain-name-servers 10.154.16.130, 10.128.0.4; # dns servers
range 192.168.0.2 192.168.0.254; # the pool of addresses for classroom
}

[root@localhost ~]# service dhcpd restart
Starting dhcpd: [FAILED]
[root@localhost ~]# service dhcpd stop
[root@localhost ~]# service dhcpd stop
[root@localhost ~]# service dhcpd restart
Starting dhcpd: [ OK ]
[root@localhost ~]#
It starts up but no leases show up, I am trying to ping computer from windows 2000 machine and from another machine running rawhide

tail -f /var/log/messages show:

Nov 16 18:51:13 localhost ntpd[2004]: kernel time sync status change 4001
Nov 16 18:54:24 localhost dhcpd: DHCPREQUEST for 10.154.19.129 from 00:06:5b:4f:d7:d2 via eth0: unknown lease 10.154.19.129.
Nov 16 18:56:32 localhost dhcpd: Internet Systems Consortium DHCP Server 4.0.0
Nov 16 18:56:32 localhost dhcpd: Copyright 2004-2007 Internet Systems Consortium.
Nov 16 18:56:32 localhost dhcpd: All rights reserved.
Nov 16 18:56:32 localhost dhcpd: For info, please visit <a href="http://www.isc.org/sw/dhcp/" title="http://www.isc.org/sw/dhcp/">http://www.isc.org/sw/dhcp/</a>
Nov 16 18:56:32 localhost dhcpd: Not searching LDAP since ldap-server, ldap-port and ldap-base-dn were not specified in the config file
Nov 16 18:56:32 localhost dhcpd: Wrote 0 leases to leases file.
Nov 16 18:56:32 localhost dhcpd: Listening on LPF/eth0/00:0e:a6:42:59:af/10.154.19.0/24
Nov 16 18:56:32 localhost dhcpd: Sending on LPF/eth0/00:0e:a6:42:59:af/10.154.19.0/24
Nov 16 18:56:32 localhost dhcpd: Sending on Socket/fallback/fallback-net
Nov 16 18:56:40 localhost dhcpd: Internet Systems Consortium DHCP Server 4.0.0
Nov 16 18:56:40 localhost dhcpd: Copyright 2004-2007 Internet Systems Consortium.
Nov 16 18:56:40 localhost dhcpd: All rights reserved.
Nov 16 18:56:40 localhost dhcpd: For info, please visit <a href="http://www.isc.org/sw/dhcp/" title="http://www.isc.org/sw/dhcp/">http://www.isc.org/sw/dhcp/</a>
Nov 16 18:56:40 localhost dhcpd: Not searching LDAP since ldap-server, ldap-port and ldap-base-dn were not specified in the config file
Nov 16 18:56:40 localhost dhcpd: Wrote 0 leases to leases file.
Nov 16 18:56:40 localhost dhcpd: Listening on LPF/eth0/00:0e:a6:42:59:af/10.154.19.0/24
Nov 16 18:56:40 localhost dhcpd: Sending on LPF/eth0/00:0e:a6:42:59:af/10.154.19.0/24
Nov 16 18:56:40 localhost dhcpd: Sending on Socket/fallback/fallback-net
Nov 16 19:06:27 localhost dhcpd: DHCPINFORM from 10.154.19.33 via eth0
Nov 16 19:06:27 localhost dhcpd: DHCPACK to 10.154.19.33 (00:0f:1f:86:fc:70) via eth0
Nov 16 19:06:30 localhost dhcpd: DHCPINFORM from 10.154.19.33 via eth0
Nov 16 19:06:30 localhost dhcpd: DHCPACK to 10.154.19.33 (00:0f:1f:86:fc:70) via eth0
Nov 16 19:12:24 localhost dhcpd: DHCPINFORM from 10.154.19.94 via eth0
Nov 16 19:12:24 localhost dhcpd: DHCPACK to 10.154.19.94 (00:40:f4:ea:ee:d3) via eth0
Nov 16 19:12:27 localhost dhcpd: DHCPINFORM from 10.154.19.94 via eth0
Nov 16 19:12:27 localhost dhcpd: DHCPACK to 10.154.19.94 (00:40:f4:ea:ee:d3) via eth0
Nov 16 19:12:57 localhost dhcpd: DHCPINFORM from 10.154.19.227 via eth0
Nov 16 19:12:57 localhost dhcpd: DHCPACK to 10.154.19.227 (00:19:b9:2a:19:37) via eth0
Nov 16 19:13:01 localhost dhcpd: DHCPINFORM from 10.154.19.227 via eth0
Nov 16 19:13:01 localhost dhcpd: DHCPACK to 10.154.19.227 (00:19:b9:2a:19:37) via eth0

Thank you all for helping me. I appreciate all your help and advice.

Regards,

Antonio

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Tim at 02/05/2009 - 23:07

The above logs look like clients *are* connecting and getting given IPs
(the "ack" acknowledge entries). If it weren't for that, I'd have been
suggesting checking the server isn't firewalled off from the clients.

Perhaps you should also show us some logs from the clients. Are these
entries from the clients you expect to work with, or are you getting
clients from someone else's network? Having two DHCP servers on a
network is a recipe for disaster, unless you know what you're doing, so
you can configure them to work co-operatively, or not to interfere with
each other.

I'm not sure if you've detailed the topology of your network, either.

On my server, admittedly it's still FC4, but you should see something
similar, I see the following logged when a client joins:

Nov 18 04:28:37 server dhcpd: DHCPDISCOVER from 00:1e:57:0a:65:e4 via eth0
Nov 18 04:28:37 server dhcpd: DHCPOFFER on 192.168.1.23 to 00:1e:57:0a:65:e4 via eth0
Nov 18 04:28:37 server dhcpd: DHCPREQUEST for 192.168.1.23 (192.168.1.2) from 00:1e:57:0a:65:e4 via eth0
Nov 18 04:28:37 server dhcpd: DHCPACK on 192.168.1.23 to 00:1e:57:0a:65:e4 via eth0

Which *may* also have some log entries about writing leases, but that
depends on whether the leases file needed modifying at the time. If a
client reconnects during their lease, it won't need to. Above was
logged with a Fedora laptop joined the LAN. And below, when a Windows
PC joined. It's slightly different in behaviour, and sends the hostname
(bracketed) along, as well.

Nov 17 14:14:20 server dhcpd: Wrote 0 deleted host decls to leases file.
Nov 17 14:14:20 server dhcpd: Wrote 0 new dynamic host decls to leases file.
Nov 17 14:14:20 server dhcpd: Wrote 9 leases to leases file.
Nov 17 14:14:20 server dhcpd: DHCPREQUEST for 192.168.1.194 from 00:05:1c:19:dd:2f (hewie) via eth0
Nov 17 14:14:20 server dhcpd: DHCPACK on 192.168.1.194 to 00:05:1c:19:dd:2f (hewie) via eth0
Nov 17 14:16:49 server dhcpd: DHCPINFORM from 192.168.1.194 via eth0
Nov 17 14:16:49 server dhcpd: DHCPACK to 192.168.1.194
Nov 17 14:16:52 server dhcpd: DHCPINFORM from 192.168.1.194 via eth0
Nov 17 14:16:52 server dhcpd: DHCPACK to 192.168.1.194

There may be delays between some things, as the system may wait before
writing settings to file (that helps when you have a large LAN, so the
drive isn't thrashed by every client), and some clients do more chatting
a little while after setup.

And the logs on my client, using F9, show this:

Nov 18 04:28:35 laptop NetworkManager: <info> DHCP: device wlan0 state changed (null) -> preinit
Nov 18 04:28:35 laptop dhclient: Listening on LPF/wlan0/00:1e:57:0a:65:e4
Nov 18 04:28:35 laptop dhclient: Sending on LPF/wlan0/00:1e:57:0a:65:e4
Nov 18 04:28:35 laptop dhclient: Sending on Socket/fallback
Nov 18 04:28:38 laptop dhclient: DHCPDISCOVER on wlan0 to 255.255.255.255 port 67 interval 8
Nov 18 04:28:38 laptop dhclient: DHCPOFFER from 192.168.1.2
Nov 18 04:28:38 laptop dhclient: DHCPREQUEST on wlan0 to 255.255.255.255 port 67
Nov 18 04:28:38 laptop dhclient: DHCPACK from 192.168.1.2
Nov 18 04:28:38 laptop NetworkManager: <info> DHCP: device wlan0 state changed preinit -> bound
Nov 18 04:28:38 laptop NetworkManager: <info> Activation (wlan0) Stage 4 of 5 (IP Configure Get) scheduled...
Nov 18 04:28:38 laptop NetworkManager: <info> Activation (wlan0) Stage 4 of 5 (IP Configure Get) started...
Nov 18 04:28:38 laptop NetworkManager: <info> address 192.168.1.23
Nov 18 04:28:38 laptop NetworkManager: <info> prefix 24 (255.255.255.0)
Nov 18 04:28:38 laptop NetworkManager: <info> gateway 192.168.1.254
Nov 18 04:28:38 laptop NetworkManager: <info> hostname 'laptop-wireless'
Nov 18 04:28:38 laptop NetworkManager: <info> nameserver '192.168.1.2'
Nov 18 04:28:38 laptop NetworkManager: <info> domain name 'lan.example.com.'
Nov 18 04:28:38 laptop NetworkManager: <info> Activation (wlan0) Stage 5 of 5 (IP Configure Commit) scheduled...
Nov 18 04:28:38 laptop NetworkManager: <info> Activation (wlan0) Stage 4 of 5 (IP Configure Get) complete.
Nov 18 04:28:38 laptop NetworkManager: <info> Activation (wlan0) Stage 5 of 5 (IP Configure Commit) started...
Nov 18 04:28:38 laptop dhclient: bound to 192.168.1.23 -- renewal in 265422 seconds.
Nov 18 04:28:39 laptop NetworkManager: <info> (wlan0): device state change: 7 -> 8
Nov 18 04:28:39 laptop NetworkManager: <info> Policy set (wlan0) as default device for routing and DNS.
Nov 18 04:28:39 laptop NetworkManager: <info> Activation (wlan0) successful, device activated.
Nov 18 04:28:39 laptop NetworkManager: <info> Activation (wlan0) Stage 5 of 5 (IP Configure Commit) complete.
Nov 18 04:28:39 laptop ntpd[2302]: Listening on interface #5 wlan0, 192.168.1.23#123 Enabled
Nov 18 04:28:39 laptop NetworkManagerDispatcher: ntpd is running, restart

Secretly, I'm glad my modem/router doesn't support IPv6, so my whole
system is IPv4. IPv6 would be yet another thing to learn about.

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Tim at 02/05/2009 - 23:07

Antonio Olivares:

Tim:

Perhaps I should say, looks like they have an IP (inform), and they're
being allowed to keep on using it (ack). If you want to see devices get
assigned IPs, you might have to make them release their current IP, then
try and get another one.

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Antonio Olivares at 02/05/2009 - 23:07

That is probably the case since the machines are looking for the big network to get their ip's and other machines at school are trying to connect to mine, the machines I have I can put them via mac address, but since I am learning I wanted to avoid that.

THe file /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth1 did not exist and I created it. I also tried to change the file /etc/syconfig/dhcpd to change the args to eth1, but file was read-only. I have webmin installed, but I am having trouble with the dhcp server.

I have put it up, but you might have missed it.

My machine is connected to a local network and is given an address via dhcp which is static according to mac address

I get address
ip address 10.154.19.210 netmask 255.255.255.0
gateway 10.154.19.1
and the nameservers
10.128.0.4
10.154.16.130

[root@localhost ~]# ifconfig -a
eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:0E:A6:42:59:AF
inet addr:10.154.19.210 Bcast:10.154.19.255 Mask:255.255.255.0
inet6 addr: fe80::20e:a6ff:fe42:59af/64 Scope:Link
UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
RX packets:186850 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:98727 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
RX bytes:152818248 (145.7 MiB) TX bytes:13202535 (12.5 MiB)
Interrupt:22

eth1 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:60:97:C5:2A:C3
BROADCAST MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
RX bytes:0 (0.0 b) TX bytes:0 (0.0 b)
Interrupt:18 Base address:0xdf00

lo Link encap:Local Loopback
inet addr:127.0.0.1 Mask:255.0.0.0
inet6 addr: ::1/128 Scope:Host
UP LOOPBACK RUNNING MTU:16436 Metric:1
RX packets:5557 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:5557 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:0
RX bytes:884348 (863.6 KiB) TX bytes:884348 (863.6 KiB)

pan0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 4A:5C:5C:CB:EA:F1
BROADCAST MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:0
RX bytes:0 (0.0 b) TX bytes:0 (0.0 b)

[root@localhost ~]#

I do not have a router, I only have the two nics on the host machine and a little 8 port 10/100 Networking switch which I have connected the host machine from eth1 to it and it to the machines I try to make work.

Thank you for helping.

Regards,

Antonio

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Bill Davidsen at 02/05/2009 - 23:07

...snip...

...snip...

Before even trying to connect, after you reload the dhcpd, do "netstat -ta" and
look to see if the server is listening (state LISTEN) on the dhcp port.
Also "ifconfig eth1" and "netstat -rn" so we can be sure you did what people
intended you to do.

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Antonio Olivares at 02/05/2009 - 23:07

Thank you Bill for your suggestions. I turned off the service, and I manually created /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth1 since it did not exist only eth0 existed and I did not put in anything special only

[root@localhost ~]# cat /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth1
# Ethernet controller: 3Com Corporation 3c905 100BaseTX [Boomerang]
DEVICE=eth1
HWADDR=00:60:97:C5:2A:C3

[root@localhost ~]# cat /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0
# nVidia Corporation nForce2 Ethernet Controller
DEVICE=eth0
BOOTPROTO=dhcp
HWADDR=00:0E:A6:42:59:AF
IPV6_AUTOCONF=yes
ONBOOT=yes
[root@localhost ~]#

dhcpd was off and this is what I got with the two commands :

[root@localhost ~]# netstat -ta
Active Internet connections (servers and established)
Proto Recv-Q Send-Q Local Address Foreign Address State
tcp 0 0 *:sunrpc *:* LISTEN
tcp 0 0 *:ndmp *:* LISTEN
tcp 0 0 localhost.localdomain:ipp *:* LISTEN
tcp 0 0 localhost.localdomain:smtp *:* LISTEN
tcp 0 0 *:37631 *:* LISTEN
tcp 0 0 10.154.19.210:52188 204.2.215.66:http ESTABLISHED
tcp 0 0 10.154.19.210:46831 rover.ebay.com:http ESTABLISHED
tcp 0 0 10.154.19.210:37620 reversed.measat.com:http ESTABLISHED
tcp 0 0 10.154.19.210:40284 reversed.measat.com:https ESTABLISHED
tcp 0 0 10.154.19.210:40287 reversed.measat.com:https ESTABLISHED
tcp 0 0 10.154.19.210:40285 reversed.measat.com:https ESTABLISHED
tcp 0 0 10.154.19.210:40286 reversed.measat.com:https ESTABLISHED
tcp 0 0 10.154.19.210:38418 204.2.215.58:http ESTABLISHED
tcp 0 0 10.154.19.210:50824 204.2.215.19:http ESTABLISHED
tcp 1 0 10.154.19.210:51117 207.123.44.123:http CLOSE_WAIT
tcp 1 0 10.154.19.210:51120 207.123.44.123:http CLOSE_WAIT
tcp 0 0 10.154.19.210:48750 204.2.215.32:http ESTABLISHED
tcp 0 0 10.154.19.210:40283 reversed.measat.com:https ESTABLISHED
tcp 0 0 10.154.19.210:40288 reversed.measat.com:https ESTABLISHED
tcp 0 0 10.154.19.210:52163 204.2.215.66:http ESTABLISHED
tcp 0 0 10.154.19.210:51942 a69.26.188.90.deploy.a:http ESTABLISHED
tcp 0 0 *:sunrpc *:* LISTEN
[1]+ Done gedit /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth1
[root@localhost ~]# ifconfig eth1
eth1 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:60:97:C5:2A:C3
BROADCAST MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
RX bytes:0 (0.0 b) TX bytes:0 (0.0 b)
Interrupt:18 Base address:0xdf00

[root@localhost ~]# netstat -rn
Kernel IP routing table
Destination Gateway Genmask Flags MSS Window irtt Iface
10.154.19.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.0 U 0 0 0 eth0
169.254.0.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.0.0 U 0 0 0 eth0
0.0.0.0 10.154.19.1 0.0.0.0 UG 0 0 0 eth0
[root@localhost ~]#

I will try to restart server and see how that goes:

[root@localhost ~]# service dhcpd status
dhcpd dead but pid file exists
[root@localhost ~]# service dhcpd stop
[root@localhost ~]# service dhcpd start
Starting dhcpd: [ OK ]

[root@localhost ~]# tail -f /var/log/messages
Nov 17 16:15:01 localhost dhcpd: Wrote 0 leases to leases file.
Nov 17 16:15:01 localhost dhcpd: Listening on LPF/eth0/00:0e:a6:42:59:af/10.154.19.0/24
Nov 17 16:15:01 localhost dhcpd: Sending on LPF/eth0/00:0e:a6:42:59:af/10.154.19.0/24
Nov 17 16:15:01 localhost dhcpd: Sending on Socket/fallback/fallback-net
Nov 17 16:15:01 localhost dhcpd: Can't create PID file /var/run/dhcpd.pid: Permission denied.
Nov 17 16:15:01 localhost kernel: type=1400 audit(1226960101.593:6): avc: denied { read } for pid=10965 comm="dhcpd" name="dhcpd.pid" dev=dm-0 ino=3244614 scontext=unconfined_u:system_r:dhcpd_t:s0 tcontext=unconfined_u:object_r:var_run_t:s0 tclass=file
Nov 17 16:15:01 localhost kernel: type=1400 audit(1226960101.593:7): avc: denied { write } for pid=10965 comm="dhcpd" name="dhcpd.pid" dev=dm-0 ino=3244614 scontext=unconfined_u:system_r:dhcpd_t:s0 tcontext=unconfined_u:object_r:var_run_t:s0 tclass=file
Nov 17 16:15:18 localhost dhcpd: DHCPDISCOVER from 00:06:5b:c6:ce:06 via eth0: network 10.154.19.0/24: no free leases
Nov 17 16:15:21 localhost dhcpd: DHCPDISCOVER from 00:06:5b:c6:ce:06 via eth0: network 10.154.19.0/24: no free leases
Nov 17 16:15:28 localhost dhcpd: DHCPDISCOVER from 00:06:5b:c6:ce:06 via eth0: network 10.154.19.0/24: no free leases
Nov 17 16:15:44 localhost dhcpd: DHCPDISCOVER from 00:06:5b:c6:ce:06 via eth0: network 10.154.19.0/24: no free leases

[olivares@localhost ~]$ cat /etc/sysconfig/dhcpd
DHCPDARGS=

[olivares@localhost ~]$ su -
Password:
[root@localhost ~]# restorecon -v /var/run /var/run/dhcpd.pid
restorecon reset /var/run/dhcpd.pid context unconfined_u:object_r:var_run_t:s0->system_u:object_r:dhcpd_var_run_t:s0

tail -f /var/log/messages

Nov 17 16:15:44 localhost dhcpd: DHCPDISCOVER from 00:06:5b:c6:ce:06 via eth0: network 10.154.19.0/24: no free leases
Nov 17 16:17:57 localhost dhcpd: DHCPINFORM from 10.154.19.79 via eth0
Nov 17 16:17:57 localhost dhcpd: DHCPACK to 10.154.19.79 (00:06:5b:4f:d7:dc) via eth0
Nov 17 16:18:00 localhost dhcpd: DHCPINFORM from 10.154.19.79 via eth0
Nov 17 16:18:00 localhost dhcpd: DHCPACK to 10.154.19.79 (00:06:5b:4f:d7:dc) via eth0
Nov 17 16:18:15 localhost kernel: type=1400 audit(1226960295.233:8): avc: denied { read write } for pid=11094 comm="restorecon" path="socket:[12486]" dev=sockfs ino=12486 scontext=unconfined_u:unconfined_r:setfiles_t:s0-s0:c0.c1023 tcontext=unconfined_u:unconfined_r:unconfined_t:s0-s0:c0.c1023 tclass=unix_stream_socket

Thanks,

Antonio

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Antonio Olivares at 02/05/2009 - 23:06

I had changed back and forth between eth0 and eth1 and now it is and should be eth0 :)

[root@localhost ~]# cat /etc/sysconfig/dhcpd
DHCPDARGS=eth0

I will sure try this and hopefully it will work. I will report back.

Thank you for your help as well :)

Regards,

Antonio

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Antonio Olivares at 02/05/2009 - 23:05

I might go to work and try it out. I will change the numbers and also add more time in the leases. I have been given great advice by several helpful people, notably yourself, Tim and Marko (also Paul H. for selinux denying dhpcd). I have to make the changes in the /etc/dhcpd.conf file and try it out. I will test with a Windows 2000 machine and a Fedora rawhide box and upon success or failure. I will report back.

Thank you all for your help and guidance.

Regards,

Antonio

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Mike at 02/05/2009 - 23:05

I did not see the reply from Paul H on fixing the SElinux issues - was this
a private reply? If so could you let us know the fix - as I will be moving
to a machine running DHCP with SElinux enabled when F10 comes out.

Thanks
Mike

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Antonio Olivares at 02/05/2009 - 23:05

no, to fedora-selinux-list
thread: avc: denied { write } for pid=5267 comm="dhcpd" name="dhcpd.pid"

see below :)

I encountered an error/avc denial:
running
# tail -f /var/log/messages:

How can I allow it to work?

Setroubleshoot has not kicked in to warn me so I do not know a fix as
of this moment :(

/var/run/dhcpd.pid should be dhcpd_var_run_t, not var_run_t.
Try:
# restorecon -v /var/run /var/run/dhcpd.pid

Paul.
Now I do not get the denial. I sent the message to <a href="mailto:fedora-selinux- ... at redhat dot com">fedora-selinux- ... at redhat dot com</a> and Paul answered my question/plea for help.

Regards,

Antonio

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Mike at 02/05/2009 - 23:05

I was looking through the selinux list and just saw the reply there - I did
not realise you had posted on that list also....

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By edwardspl at 02/05/2009 - 23:05

Hello,

What is the output by the following ?
cat /etc/selinux/config

Thanks !

Edward.

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Antonio Olivares at 02/05/2009 - 23:04

Also, I forgot to mention that ifcfg-eth1 does not exist, should I create it? and what should I put in it also?

[root@localhost ~]# cd /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/
[root@localhost network-scripts]# ls
ifcfg-eth0 ifdown-isdn ifup-aliases ifup-plip ifup-wireless
ifcfg-lo ifdown-post ifup-bnep ifup-plusb init.ipv6-global
ifdown ifdown-ppp ifup-eth ifup-post net.hotplug
ifdown-bnep ifdown-routes ifup-ippp ifup-ppp network-functions
ifdown-eth ifdown-sit ifup-ipsec ifup-routes network-functions-ipv6
ifdown-ippp ifdown-sl ifup-ipv6 ifup-sit
ifdown-ipsec ifdown-tunnel ifup-ipx ifup-sl
ifdown-ipv6 ifup ifup-isdn ifup-tunnel
[root@localhost network-scripts]# cat ifcfg-eth0
# nVidia Corporation nForce2 Ethernet Controller
DEVICE=eth0
BOOTPROTO=dhcp
HWADDR=00:0E:A6:42:59:AF
IPV6_AUTOCONF=yes
ONBOOT=yes
[root@localhost network-scripts]# ifconfig -a
eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:0E:A6:42:59:AF
inet addr:10.154.19.210 Bcast:10.154.19.255 Mask:255.255.255.0
inet6 addr: fe80::20e:a6ff:fe42:59af/64 Scope:Link
UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
RX packets:202848 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:61502 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
RX bytes:106886534 (101.9 MiB) TX bytes:10819090 (10.3 MiB)
Interrupt:22 Base address:0x6000

eth1 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:60:97:C5:2A:C3
inet6 addr: fe80::260:97ff:fec5:2ac3/64 Scope:Link
UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
RX packets:572 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:10 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
RX bytes:102299 (99.9 KiB) TX bytes:1836 (1.7 KiB)
Interrupt:18 Base address:0xdf00

lo Link encap:Local Loopback
inet addr:127.0.0.1 Mask:255.0.0.0
inet6 addr: ::1/128 Scope:Host
UP LOOPBACK RUNNING MTU:16436 Metric:1
RX packets:64 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:64 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:0
RX bytes:10582 (10.3 KiB) TX bytes:10582 (10.3 KiB)

pan0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr AA:FA:32:AC:03:01
BROADCAST MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:0
RX bytes:0 (0.0 b) TX bytes:0 (0.0 b)

[root@localhost network-scripts]#

only ifcfg-eth0 exists, and it is the one that gets the ip from the network, the other one is the one that will forward the packets so that other machines can get ips and connect to the internet.

Thanks,

Antonio

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Antonio Olivares at 02/05/2009 - 23:04

Quick question:

Simple troubleshooting steps and tips For DHCP

If things didn’t go as you excepted–for example, the dhcp server didn’t start–you should do a bit of troubleshooting. DHCP can be very frustrating to fix. Here are a few things to check:

1. Configure DHCP to only listen on a specific interface. Being explicit is always a safe bet, so you can edit /etc/sysconfig/dhcpd and define the interface to listen on. For eth0, this would look like:

# Command line options here
DHCPDARGS=eth0

eth0 is the one that gets an IP from the network, The eth1 is the one that should send the packets to the Networking switch which will give out the ips and dns and all.

I have installed bind as well. I am not sure if the iptables are masquerading to send the packets out? and also I am not sure if the DHCPARGS=eth0 or eth1.

Thanks,

Antonio

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Antonio Olivares at 02/05/2009 - 23:04

Breakthrough, changed the ARGS to
[olivares@localhost ~]$ cat /etc/sysconfig/dhcpd
# Command line options here
DHCPDARGS=eth0

and it is working :)

[root@localhost ~]# dhcpd -f
Internet Systems Consortium DHCP Server 4.0.0
Copyright 2004-2007 Internet Systems Consortium.
All rights reserved.
For info, please visit <a href="http://www.isc.org/sw/dhcp/" title="http://www.isc.org/sw/dhcp/">http://www.isc.org/sw/dhcp/</a>
Warning: subnet 10.154.19.0/27 overlaps subnet 10.154.19.0/24
Not searching LDAP since ldap-server, ldap-port and ldap-base-dn were not specified in the config file
Wrote 0 leases to leases file.
Listening on LPF/eth0/00:0e:a6:42:59:af/10.154.19.0/24
Sending on LPF/eth0/00:0e:a6:42:59:af/10.154.19.0/24
Sending on Socket/fallback/fallback-net
^C
[root@localhost ~]# service dhcpd stop
[root@localhost ~]# service dhcpd start
Starting dhcpd: [ OK ]

but now selinux gets in the way :(

Nov 14 20:03:40 localhost kernel: type=1400 audit(1226714620.135:183): avc: denied { read } for pid=5267 comm="dhcpd" name="dhcpd.pid" dev=dm-0 ino=3244731 scontext=unconfined_u:system_r:dhcpd_t:s0 tcontext=unconfined_u:object_r:var_run_t:s0 tclass=file
Nov 14 20:03:40 localhost kernel: type=1400 audit(1226714620.135:184): avc: denied { write } for pid=5267 comm="dhcpd" name="dhcpd.pid" dev=dm-0 ino=3244731scontext=unconfined_u:system_r:dhcpd_t:s0 tcontext=unconfined_u:object_r:var_run_t:s0 tclass=file
Nov 14 20:03:40 localhost dhcpd: Can't create PID file /var/run/dhcpd.pid: Permission denied.

How can I allow it to work?

Thanks,

Antonio

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Antonio Olivares at 02/05/2009 - 23:04

After this breakthrough I also found out or not sure here?
is that iptables are forwarding packets to eth1

upon reading another page:
<a href="http://chwang.blogspot.com/2007/11/making-linux-fedora-core-8-as-gateway.html" title="http://chwang.blogspot.com/2007/11/making-linux-fedora-core-8-as-gateway.html">http://chwang.blogspot.com/2007/11/making-linux-fedora-core-8-as-gateway...</a>

it says iptables and has this part:

# Forward all packets from eth1 (internal network) to eth0 (the public internet)
iptables -A FORWARD -i eth1 -o eth0 -j ACCEPT
# Forward packets that are part of existing and related connections from eth0 to eth1
iptables -A FORWARD -i eth0 -o eth1 -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT
# Enable SNAT functionality on eth0. a.b.c.d are generally the ip of the eth0
iptables -A POSTROUTING -t nat -s 192.168.1.0/24 -o eth0 -j SNAT --to-source a.

Then it recommends visiting the other page which was referenced before.

I will probably get to this machine tomorrow or on Monday. I hope that I can get this working and with advice from the list I believe it can get done.

Regards,

Antonio

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By Antonio Olivares at 02/05/2009 - 23:08

I see that the forwarding is not there anymore :(
See here:

[root@localhost ~]# cat /etc/sysconfig/iptables
# Firewall configuration written by system-config-securitylevel
# Manual customization of this file is not recommended.
*filter
:INPUT ACCEPT [0:0]
:FORWARD ACCEPT [0:0]
:OUTPUT ACCEPT [0:0]
:RH-Firewall-1-INPUT - [0:0]
-A INPUT -j RH-Firewall-1-INPUT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -i lo -j ACCEPT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -p icmp --icmp-type any -j ACCEPT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -p 50 -j ACCEPT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -p 51 -j ACCEPT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -p udp --dport 5353 -d 224.0.0.251 -j ACCEPT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -p udp -m udp --dport 631 -j ACCEPT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -p tcp -m tcp --dport 631 -j ACCEPT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -m state --state NEW -m tcp -p tcp --dport 22 -j ACCEPT
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -j REJECT --reject-with icmp-host-prohibited
-A FORWARD -j REJECT --reject-with icmp-host-prohibited
COMMIT

I can try using system-config-firewall to allow it or how do I do it, I added it manually and then ran iptables-save, but it is not there anymore :(

Thank you all for your help,

Antonio

Re: Make a DHCP server using Fedora - Help

By edwardspl at 02/05/2009 - 23:04

Dear You,

Sorry...
What is your problem ?

Thanks !

Edward.