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wiped disk - no longer bootable

Hi

The problems pile up. I've wiped the first megabyte of both devices
(HDD and SSD), because I got a message on boot which sayed that the
disk with a specific ID can't be found. Using "dd if=/dev/zero
of=/dev/sda ...". Then installed Ubuntu again, which appeared to
succeed. But when booting now, it says that there is no bootable medium.

So I have wiped something which I shouldn't. How do I restore that? It
doesn't seem to be something which fdisk does.

:-(

Bye
Volker

Comments

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By compdoc at 07/09/2019 - 09:54

Boot Gparted and create new partition tables, MBR or GPT, and install
the OS on the SSD. The idea that a cache is better than just running
from the SSD is false. Caches use algorithms to decide the most
frequently used files, then place those files in the cache. All of that
takes time. Small amounts of time, but still...

With the OS on the SSD, all system files and program files are quickly
available, and loading pictures directly is better than waiting for the
cache to do its thing.

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By oxy via ubuntu-users at 07/09/2019 - 10:03

On Tue, 2019-07-09 at 07:54 -0600, compdoc wrote:
+10000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000

I'm using cheap SATA3 SSDs only, no PCIe SSDs and since they are cheap,
they don't come with an exorbitant amount of cache. My machine is hard a
real-time usage machine. A less good SATA3 SSD without any special cache
thingy is fast as lightning. Most, if not all machines suffer from other
performance bottlenecks.

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By oxy via ubuntu-users at 07/09/2019 - 10:24

Ok, my replies regarding cache and SSDs sound nonreflective.

What I tried to point out.

Get a case or docking station for your HDD and make it a backup drive.

Use SSDs only for the machine. If you want to improve something by
cache, then just a huge amount of RAM might make sense. RAM without any
freakish settings, since Linux by default does use RAM in a smart way,
e.g. as cache.

Btw. you hopefully don't use a swap on your HDD ;). In practise even
swap on the SSD should be completely untouched.

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By oxy via ubuntu-users at 07/09/2019 - 10:06

On Tue, 09 Jul 2019 16:03:01 +0200, Ralf Mardorf via ubuntu-users wrote:
Bad typing :D

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By oxy via ubuntu-users at 07/09/2019 - 09:42

Initialize the HDD and the SSD by generating new MBRs (or if you
prefer GPTs) and reformat them with virgin ext4 partitions. Don't use
encryption, LVM or anything special, such as e.g. raid at all. At best
use MBR for testing purpose and even if you should be in favour of
another FS, stay with ext4 for testing purpose.

For trouble shooting strictly follow
KISS, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KISS_principle" title="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KISS_principle">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KISS_principle</a>, at least as far as
possible with Ubuntu or an Ubuntu flavour. Way better, if you have got
the skills to do so, even consider to test with Arch Linux, Gentoo or
even FreeBSD (FreeBSD OTOH is similar to LVM by default ;), or if
possible at least by using the Ubuntu server image, Ubuntu mini
whatsoever, net or so thingy.

Btw. what ISO are you using, in case of "Ubuntu" consider to try
Xubuntu or Ubuntu Mate, or if you want to stay closer to gnomish Ubuntu,
maybe Ubuntu Budgie, as a gnomish alternative. Just try anything
different of what you were using until now.

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By Volker Wysk at 07/09/2019 - 12:35

Zitat von Ralf Mardorf via ubuntu-users <ubuntu- ... at lists dot ubuntu.com>:

Sorry, I couldn't find out how to create an MBR from scratch.

Okay, that's what I was trying last.

I'm trying it with vanilla Ubuntu 19.04.

When the problem first struck, I was on Kubuntu. Now Ubuntu, but still broken.

Good bye,
Volker

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By oxy via ubuntu-users at 07/09/2019 - 12:55

On Tue, 09 Jul 2019 18:35:14 +0200, Volker Wysk wrote:
In what way is Ubuntu broken?

I already suspect a hardware failure, but to be completely sure,
install a 16.04 Xubuntu as well as a 16.04 Ubuntu Mate.

If the 16.04 installs should work, then install a 19.04 Xubuntu and a
19.04 Ubuntu Mate.

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By Volker Wysk at 07/10/2019 - 03:43

Zitat von Ralf Mardorf via ubuntu-users <ubuntu- ... at lists dot ubuntu.com>:

I mean, the problem still occurs. I don't think Ubuntu is broken.

But how to reproduce the problem? It occurs only sporadicalli. You
can't be sure that it works, the problem could always not have been
triggered yet...

I've installed (KISS) ubuntu 19.04 on the HDD and the SSD, and found
no corruption yet.

%-(

Maybe I need new hardware - that would mean, a new computer. %-((

bye

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By oxy via ubuntu-users at 07/09/2019 - 13:18

I'm in favour of using a mobo for around 10 years, actually my last mobo
was borked after around 7 or 8 years. I've got the skills to repair
broken hardware myself, let alone that a friend of mine has got way
more skills than I've got and at work he has got special equipment at
hand, such as e.g. hot air soldering. However, at some point, "borked"
is literally for "borked" ;).

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By Gene Heskett at 07/09/2019 - 19:08

That depends on the mobo. I needed to shotgun the caps around the cpu on
an IBM mobo a couple years back and discovered they were using a massive
area of extra thick copper on both sides of the board for heat sinks to
cool the caps. That mobo was simply not repairable because my hot air
tools were burning the foil off the board on one side while trying to
telegraph enough heat to the other, inaccessable side of the board to
free the defective caps. Only a dip in a wave soldering machine would
have freed those parts. IBM can afford one of those, but you or I can
only dream of access to such a production device.

Cheers, Gene Heskett

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By oxy via ubuntu-users at 07/10/2019 - 02:41

On Tue, 2019-07-09 at 19:08 -0400, Gene Heskett wrote:
Gene, you don't own one? The slum landlord as well as the German law
don't allow me to break through the load-bearing wall in my flat. So
there's no room for my wave soldering line inside of my flat. It's
stored in moving boxes in my cellar room.

;)

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By oxy via ubuntu-users at 07/10/2019 - 03:08

On Tue, 9 Jul 2019 19:08:21 -0400, Gene Heskett wrote:
It's possible to heat both sides, unfortunately the VIAs of multilayer
PCBs tend to be allergic to too much heat, so it's a game of pure
chance.

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By Mike Marchywka at 07/10/2019 - 03:56

On Wed, Jul 10, 2019 at 09:08:35AM +0200, Ralf Mardorf via ubuntu-users wrote:
Did these guys go lead free or you know the alloy/ melting point?
How hard is it to get to both sides?
I guess you could hack up the caps, maybe just with pliers, leaving just
wire and through the holes but that would be a huge mess. Then
just grab the remaining wire with needle nose pliers and
pull it while heating.

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By oxy via ubuntu-users at 07/10/2019 - 05:45

On Wed, 10 Jul 2019 07:56:20 +0000, Mike Marchywka wrote:
The heat isn't evenly spread. Even if you try to vacuum of the solder
with a professional unsoldering station, you probably would pull the
remaining wire and the VIA or as Gene already mentioned, you burn the
PCB and you might damage the conductor path. I tried to solder out
borked caps of my mixing console's SMPS with my less good equipment, a
friend tried at home with a professional unsoldering station from
Weller, it didn't work. At work the friend could use very good
professional hot air equipment and he was able to replace the caps, but
it wasn't easy to do.

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By Mike Marchywka at 07/10/2019 - 06:28

On Wed, Jul 10, 2019 at 11:45:05AM +0200, Ralf Mardorf via ubuntu-users wrote:
Unsoldering a ground plane may be a problem but it gets worse if the
melting temp of the solder has increased- curious what
they wave solder these days. Eutectic Pb/Sn would be great but
the new alloys may even have issues with their interactions
with the board metal- maybe making them more prone to rip on
desoldering. For that matter maybe even the flux chemistry matter.
Even with tight tolerances the facotry inserted leads should be
pretty straight and allow solder to flow in and then pull the thing
out.
I guess if it is a really odd solder chemistry maybe there is a
selective etch that won't wreck everything nearby.

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By oxy via ubuntu-users at 07/10/2019 - 08:15

On Wed, 10 Jul 2019 10:28:54 +0000, Mike Marchywka wrote:
I don't know anything about the reputation of Liam's friend, but I know
a lot about Gene's and my own reputation. It doesn't matter that much,
since the friend I mentioned, is the kind of technician high-tech
companies likely would hire to unsolder the components from the crashed
space craft they hide in Area 51. Actually he was able to unsolder the
cpas from my power supply. However, he mentioned that it wasn't easy to
unsolder the caps. Btw. the friend told me that the odd
lead-free solder we know from the end of the 90th improved a lot. When
I was forced to use the first lead-free solder working for a studio
audio gear company I was p????d off. It was comparable to using good
solder, but using a 10 Deutsche Mark soldering gun from the
do-it-yourself store. We had solder on our hands, in our faces, but got
unacceptable solder joints.

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By Mike Marchywka at 07/10/2019 - 08:26

On Wed, Jul 10, 2019 at 02:15:34PM +0200, Ralf Mardorf via ubuntu-users wrote:
Lead is a great material for solder but there is no single
"lead free" product. At least with plumbing, which is
copper to copper, Sn/Sb is popular and some Bi alloys
were thought to be unreliable. Ag alloys often having higher
temps and Cu may be better able to interdiffuse. And then
there are changes in fluxes. No sure if rosin core is compatible
with everything now. I did notice the last time I watched a plumber
he was soldering with MAPP gas, much hotter than propane.

No one is drinking circuit boards so I thought they kept the
lead there. If you look at overall junk creation by
making repair impossible you can see even with green
technologies there are a lot of tradeoffs...

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By oxy via ubuntu-users at 07/10/2019 - 09:26

On Wed, 10 Jul 2019 12:26:46 +0000, Mike Marchywka wrote:
But we breathe while soldering, IIRC by law we needed to solder <= 190°C
to reduce halogens in the air. The temperature (190°C or what ever else
it was) wasn't an issue, when using classic leaded solder.

Even if repair is possible, usually it doesn't pay to repair
predetermined breaking points or end of support computer gear.

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By oxy via ubuntu-users at 07/10/2019 - 02:57

On Tue, 9 Jul 2019 19:08:21 -0400, Gene Heskett wrote:

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By Liam Proven at 07/10/2019 - 06:19

On Wed, 10 Jul 2019 at 01:10, Gene Heskett < ... at shentel dot net> wrote:
A friend tried to replace the caps on my iMac G5 a few years ago. Same
problem. :-(

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By Liam Proven at 07/09/2019 - 13:10

On Tue, 9 Jul 2019 at 18:57, Ralf Mardorf via ubuntu-users

I agree.

I would also add: pick ``memtest86+'' from the CD boot menu, and leave
it running overnight.

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By oxy via ubuntu-users at 07/09/2019 - 12:47

On Tue, 2019-07-09 at 18:35 +0200, Volker Wysk wrote:
My apologies, it's just not my day, as you might have noticed by some of
my other replies :D.

I should have written less about KISS, but instead give the hint
fortunately compdoc provided on Tue, 2019-07-09 at 07:54 -0600:

AFAIK all Ubuntu and Ubuntu flavor desktop live media by default come
with gparted, so you don't need to burn a new media. If I should be
mistaken, you just need to run

sudo apt update && sudo apt install gparted

after booting an Ubuntu {,flavour} live media.

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By Volker Wysk at 07/09/2019 - 14:19

Zitat von Ralf Mardorf via ubuntu-users <ubuntu- ... at lists dot ubuntu.com>:

To whom are you telling this...

So Gparted is a regular program, not something that is to be booted
("Boot Gparted"). That was confusing.

I'm trying to repair my SSD (/dev/sdb) now, using GParted. I select
"create partition table" in the "device" menu. It asks for which
partition table type to use, but "MBR" isn't listed. "msdos" is the
default, "gpt" is in the list.

So I just chose GPT. (Googled a little about the difference, and it
tells you that MBR is just outdated in regard to GPT).

Bye
Volker

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By Liam Proven at 07/09/2019 - 17:45

On Tue, 9 Jul 2019 at 20:21, Volker Wysk <post@volker-wysk.de> wrote:
:-o

Yes! How do you normally partition disks?

MBR means Master Boot Record. That *is* the MS-DOS partitioning scheme.

<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master_boot_record" title="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master_boot_record">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master_boot_record</a>

Not at all. Not even a little bit.

GPT is newer, but it is only needed for disks >2 GB, and only UEFI
machines can boot from GPT. (Officially -- there are workarounds, I
believe.)

Macs and Itanium servers use GPT. MBR is more standard on PCs and
works with both BIOS and UEFI.

I generally use MBR for this reason.

I do not want to be rude but I have to ask.

If you do not know basic stuff like this, why are you trying to use
fancy enterprise-server stuff like LVM, cache disks, disk encryption
and so on? This is advanced level, rocket-science stuff!

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By Volker Wysk at 07/10/2019 - 02:32

Zitat von Liam Proven < ... at gmail dot com>:

With the ubuntu installer.

My mainboard is old. So it's a BIOS, not UEFI, right? But I had a
single partition of almost 4 TB. So why did it work?

Okay

I just used the (k)ubuntu installer for LVM and encryption.

Bye
Volker

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By Liam Proven at 07/10/2019 - 06:33

:-o

It works but it's so limited that I normally do it myself with Gparted first.

Like I said: there are workarounds. GPT has a miniature fake MBR
embedded in it so that old machines at least see the disk, so people
don't accidentally erase the thing in the mistaken belief that it's
empty.

This fake MBR can be used to embed a small bootable partition, I
believe. I have not tried. I do not own (at home or work) any disks
big enough to _need_ GPT so except on my Mac I use MBR to keep it
simple.

Secondarily: a single 4 *TB* partition? :-o

I wrote some guidance on partitioning here:

<a href="https://www.theregister.co.uk/Print/2010/06/23/reg_linux_guide_2" title="https://www.theregister.co.uk/Print/2010/06/23/reg_linux_guide_2">https://www.theregister.co.uk/Print/2010/06/23/reg_linux_guide_2</a>

If it's 4TB then you must use GPT. MBR can't handle a disk that big.

The one bonus of GPT is that you do not have to deal with "primary"
and "extended" partitions and logical drives any more. That only
applies to MBR.

So, step 1. Put Win10 on it first. This makes it much easier to update
your BIOS even if nothing else. You don't need a licence key or
anything and the ISO is a free download from microsoft.com

Make Windows' partition a fairly small part of such a big disk, e.g. 128 GB.

It will make some of its own Windows black magic volumes. Something like:

[#1 - EFI system partition]
[#2 - Windows system reserved]
[#3 - Windows C drive]

You can then shrink #3 if needed and make in addition:

[#4 - BIOS boot for Grub]
[#5 - Linux root] -- 64 GB is huge
[#6 - 2nd Linux root] for experimenting/disaster recovery
[#7 - Linux home] All the rest of the space, leaving 2x RAM for swap]
[#8 - Linux swap] at the end of the disk

That is what I would suggest as a reasonable use of so much space.

Installing Windows will also highlight any possible hardware problems.

Wow. OK. Well, I strongly suggest following the advice of people here
and trying to keep things as simple and "vanilla" as possible when it
comes to fancy partitioning systems, LVM, encryption, etc.

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By Volker Wysk at 07/12/2019 - 08:18

Zitat von Liam Proven < ... at gmail dot com>:

Yes. That's KISS! :-) No need to introduce more partitions than for
/ and for /boot.

I strongly support that advice. Only when I need to stray from the
vanilla path, for what I have in mind, I do it. How more vanilla could
it get, than clicking a single check box for LVM/encryption. My
SSD-as-a-cache (dm-cache) however, isn't vanilla at all ... ... ...

Bye!
Volker

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By Liam Proven at 07/12/2019 - 08:29

On Fri, 12 Jul 2019 at 14:20, Volker Wysk <post@volker-wysk.de> wrote:
Not really. For a start, having /home on a separate volume makes
backup, recovery, dual-booting etc. much easier. Most machines don't
need /boot any more. Separate /swap is good for performance. Etc. etc.

Yeah, but you aren't!

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By oxy via ubuntu-users at 07/12/2019 - 09:16

Volker, seemingly nobody on this list does use a setup such as yours
or those who do, don't reply for what reason ever.

_Nobody_ contributing to this thread has got the slightest idea, if you
suffer from a hardware or software issue or if the problem exists
between chair and keyboard.

It is absolutely ok, if you don't have skills related to hardware, you
still could have the skills to set up an unusual install.

However, _for troubleshooting purpose do not question the term "KISS"_.
Indeed, "KISS" is not per se a term that doesn't allow different points
of view, but in this context "KISS" was explained. I apologize for
introducing the term "KISS" to this thread. My bad!

If you want to get really useful help, start without doing anything
that is beyond the skills and/or imagination of those trying to help
you.

We need to know what happens, if you do a completely idiotproof install
in the first place and then stay with it during the process of sane
troubleshooting, as long as it makes sense to stay with this install.

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By Volker Wysk at 07/13/2019 - 09:53

Zitat von Ralf Mardorf via ubuntu-users <ubuntu- ... at lists dot ubuntu.com>:

This I can understand. :)

I am setting up, for testing purposes, a vanilla Ubuntu 19.04 system.
Right now it's still unpacking my backup (taking many hours). It's
encrypted, and this incurs LVM. Sounds like a normal setup, since the
encryption is very easy to set up, with the Ubuntu installer. I want
to try to use that system, so the corruption gets triggered, if it's
still there. I have the hope that this works and the corruption
doesn't occur again.

I should have used an LTS release for that, but now it's too late.

"beyond the skills and/or imagination of those trying to help you."
denotes my SSD-as-a-Cache, isn't it? I haven't set up that again yet.
When the system appears to be stable, I'll activate it, in order to
see if that's what causes the corruption.

Okay... I'll try it with a "completely iditproof install" later, in
case the corruption strikes again.

Bye,
Volker

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By Liam Proven at 07/15/2019 - 06:19

Not *just* that, no.

LVM + encryption + ssd-as-cache = fear

* I don't like LVM and don't use it. It makes life too complex. IMHO
it is only worth it on big servers with multiple hard disks.

(I speak as someone who has made a career out of understanding and
mastering difficult IT technology since the 1980s. I can judge when
something is elegant and when it's a nasty kludge. In my professional
opinion, LVM is a nasty kludge. It has too many layers: a partitioning
scheme, then LVM, then partitions on LVM, then a filesystem on the
partitions. That is nasty. This is why more modern filesystems such as
ZFS *exist*: they merge the volume management and partitioning and
filesystem into one layer. This removes a lot of duplication and makes
them easier to understand, to implement, and in theory, more robust.
Btrfs does some of this but IMHO not enough. Even Red Hat has
acknowledged this and as a result it is developing its own new volume
manager, Stratis, which merges LVM and XFS into one unit.)

* I don't like disk encryption and don't use it.

(E.g. at my previous job at a Linux vendor, I was issued a very nice-
then state-of-the-art Thinkpad X240 with a ½ TB SSD. But company rules
meant it had to have full disk encryption (FDE). It took me 3 days to
get this working -- that's after ½ century of Linux knowledge, and,
you know, _getting a job at a Linux vendor_ -- and when it worked the
machine became as slow as if it had a hard disk.)

FDE is arguably worth it if *both* [a] you work with confidential info
and [b] you use a notebook which could be lost or stolen. On a desktop
or on a home computer, forget it.

* SSD as cache: why?

The easy way is root on SSD, /home on HD. This gives great speed for
most jobs and can be tuned with tools such as compcache, tmpfs,
swapspace, zram and so on to ensure that temporary work files are held
on nice fast media while you have a dead simple, easy-to-troubleshoot
disk setup.

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By Volker Wysk at 07/15/2019 - 07:01

Zitat von Liam Proven < ... at gmail dot com>:

Maybe it's because I don't know anything different, but I don't feel
like it's that complicated. Especially if you don't dig into it, but
just use the Ubuntu installer. ;-)

So you manually set up full disk encryption, because you had to. For
me it's the same as above: Just use the Ubuntu installer. No stress.

There are many possible circumstances which make you want encryption...

You just caught me on giving up on SSD-as-a-cache. I've tried to set
it up again, but it doesn't work. It possibly comes from incompatible
changes in the OS (Kubuntu 18.04 versus Ubuntu 19.04).

I spent a lot of time earlier, on setting it up. Time which I don't
want to go to waste. But I don't want to go into the details again,
either. And when I manage to get it working again, for how long will
that be?

So I will do something as / on SSD and /home on HDD. But I have a lot
of pictures. It's much faster when they reside an on SSD, or a HDD
with SSD-as-a-cache. I will have to make a setup with user files
partially on the SSD. Using a lot of symlinks.

Cheers,
Volker

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By compdoc at 07/15/2019 - 06:46

However, many have used LVM and encryption successfully for years, and
the Ubuntu installer defaults to it for encryption. And lots of
utilities will work with it now. Therefore, I have to declare it safe
and sound, and a reasonable choice. Its the using of a 500Gig drive as
cache that's stupid when SSDs are so fast and reliable, and OSes and
programs will cache intelligently for you these days.

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By Liam Proven at 07/15/2019 - 06:58

True.

Oh, yes, I think it is. Overcomplex and difficult, but safe, sure.

The thing is, if you only have 1 or even 2 disks, it really doesn't
give you anything useful.

Therefore, I can't agree with:

I think that only applies if you're juggling enough drives to make not
just RAID viable, but RAID 6 or above.

RAID 0 (striping) and RAID 1 (mirroring) aren't true RAID. RAID 5 is
minimum 3 disks. RAID 6 is 2 parity disks -- an array can lose 2
drives and keep running -- and only works with 4+ drives. It's only
really worth doing with 5+ drives.

Which is where stuff starts to get complex. It needs effort to plan
and to implement.

If you are into that zone of complexity, then LVM pays back the effort.

OTOH, I would prefer something that integrates LVM into partitioning
and formatting. Such as XFS, or Stratis when it becomes stable and
mature enough.

There *was* something like that, called EVMS:

<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enterprise_Volume_Management_System" title="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enterprise_Volume_Management_System">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enterprise_Volume_Management_System</a>

But LVM was simpler at implementation level, so EVMS never made it
into the kernel. The EVMS team gracefully backed down.

The problem is that sometimes the thing that is simpler to implement
is more complex to use. This is called the "worse is better" approach
and all of *nix is a direct result of it:

<a href="https://www.jwz.org/doc/worse-is-better.html" title="https://www.jwz.org/doc/worse-is-better.html">https://www.jwz.org/doc/worse-is-better.html</a>

Agreed. I would not use a word so strong as "stupid" but I don't see the point.

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By oxy via ubuntu-users at 07/12/2019 - 09:27

On Fri, 12 Jul 2019 15:16:54 +0200, Ralf Mardorf wrote:
At the moment I halfe expect the maximum credible accident: Broken
hardware in combination with bad maintained and buggy software and a
user who doesn't know what he is doing. Apart from this I also
suspect that those contributing to this thread either don't have
experiences with a setup such as yours (at least I don't have those
experiences) or they have experiences with a very similar setup and
reasons to not use such a setup.

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By oxy via ubuntu-users at 07/10/2019 - 09:59

On Wed, 10 Jul 2019 12:33:20 +0200, Liam Proven wrote:
Wouldn't it require UEFI? The OP's machine has got a legacy BIOS.
Fortunately the OP can use an USB stick or USB drive to load the BIOS
software, without an operating system. However, I guess usually
vendor's recommend to use <a href="https://www.freedos.org/" title="https://www.freedos.org/">https://www.freedos.org/</a>, if users aren't
using a Windows and the BIOS doesn't support the USB method.

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By Liam Proven at 07/10/2019 - 10:09

On Wed, 10 Jul 2019 at 16:01, Ralf Mardorf via ubuntu-users
<ubuntu- ... at lists dot ubuntu.com> wrote:
Win10? No. It works with both. It's the most widely-compatible OS in
the world. You can't sell an x86 box if it doesn't run Windows. It is
the lowest of all common denominators.

Seems to be.

Looks that way, and that's good news.

It sometimes works. Not all vendors provide re-Flashing tools that can
run under DOS.

I have even seen DOS reflashing tools that are only available for
download in a Windows self-extracting file that no Linux archiver can
open. >_<

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By oxy via ubuntu-users at 07/09/2019 - 14:51

On Tue, 09 Jul 2019 20:19:06 +0200, Volker Wysk wrote:
The good news, this is "MBR" :).

The bad news, it's not much likely that the cause is a software issue or
that you miss the forest for the trees (nice formulation for you are
most likely not an idiot as to the issue).

Get used to the idea, that hardware is broken.

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By oxy via ubuntu-users at 07/09/2019 - 15:00

On Tue, 9 Jul 2019 20:51:36 +0200, Ralf Mardorf wrote:

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By compdoc at 07/09/2019 - 15:26

Agreed, there is no proof that any hardware is broken.

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By compdoc at 07/09/2019 - 14:41

On 7/9/19 12:19 PM, Volker Wysk wrote:
No, gparted can be downloaded and booted directly, and it also comes
installed on the live DVD. Or you can install it yourself and run it
from Ubuntu.

However, to change or create the partition table on the drives, they
must not be mounted so you must boot gparted for that.

Also know that when you change the partition table, all existing
partitions are wiped away.

Re: wiped disk - no longer bootable

By Volker Wysk at 07/09/2019 - 15:09

Zitat von compdoc < ... at hotrodpc dot com>:

Or boot from an USB stick and use it from there.

Okay, Thnx

Volker